DEA Lookup.com Healthcare Industry News: 2014



Pediatricians' Group Opposes Legal Marijuana
Marijuana shouldn't be legalized because of the potential harm it can cause children and teens, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. More...


Sugar molecule links red meat consumption and elevated cancer risk in mice
While people who eat a lot of red meat are known to be at higher risk for certain cancers, other carnivores are not, prompting researchers to investigate the possible tumor-forming role of a sugar called Neu5Gc, which is naturally found in most mammals but not in humans. More...


Yoga as a potential therapy for cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome
The potential for yoga to have an impact on concrete, physiological outcomes that represent some of the greatest health burdens today has been demonstrated through new research. More...


Binge drinking disrupts immune system in young adults, study finds
Binge drinking in young, healthy adults significantly disrupts the immune system, according to a study led by a researcher now at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. More...


Estrogen worsens allergic reactions in mice
The study results may help explain why women frequently experience more severe allergic reactions compared to men. More...


MIT Researcher: Glyphosate Herbicide will Cause Half of All Children to Have Autism by 2025
Half of All Children Will Be Autistic by 2025, Warns Senior Research Scientist at MIT Stephanie Seneff. More...


Fast food linked to lower test scores
The more often a child eats fast food, the more poorly he or she is likely to do on academic tests later, concludes a new study at Ohio State University. More...


Childhood Abuse Related to Migraine Later in Life: Study
Childhood abuse or neglect is likely to lead to migraine headaches as adults, says a study from Johns Hopkins University. More...


Tooth loss linked to mental and physical decline
New research suggests that tooth loss in older adults may be an early indicator of physical and mental decline. More...


Hugging it out could help you ward off a cold
Carnegie Mellon researchers found frequent hugs really might protect people from getting sick. More...


Study links autism to air pollution exposure in pregnancy
Women who are exposed to high levels of air pollution during their third trimester of pregnancy may be twice as likely to have an autistic child, a study found. More...


Yoga may guard against heart disease, study finds
Doing yoga may be a good way to protect against heart disease, particularly if you cannot do more vigorous exercise, research suggests. More...


People who feel younger may live longer
Everyone dies, but a new study says feeling sprightly might suggest a person has more time left than people who feel their age or older. More...


Survey: E-cigarette use surpasses regular cigs among teen smokers
Electronic cigarettes have surpassed traditional smoking in popularity among teens, the government’s annual drug use survey finds. More...


Sugars Linked to Hypertension, as Dangerous as Added Salt
Added sugar in food - especially in the form of high fructose corn syrup - is linked to hypertension and cardiovascular disease, and may be more related to blood pressure than sodium. More...


Memory Lapses May Be A Sign of Stroke, Researchers say
A study has been conducted which finds that highly educated people who complain of memory lapses may be at a higher risk of stroke. More...


Losing Weight Could Drastically Reduce Breast Cancer Death Risk
Modest weight loss could dramatically improve a breast cancer patient’s chances of survival, according to new research published earlier this month at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. More...


E-Cigarette Use May Be Rising Among Teens
Nearly a third of Hawaiian high school students have tried e-cigarettes, new research suggests. More...


Study links Parkinson's disease to gut bacteria
A new study finds that compared to healthy controls, people with Parkinson's disease appear to have distinctly different gut bacteria. They have hardly any bacteria from one family and the amount present from another family seems to increase with disease severity. More...


Scientists create food ingredient to make you feel fuller
Scientists have successfully developed an ingredient that can be added to foods to make people feel full and also prevent weight gain. More...


Bisphenol A in Canned Goods Linked to Higher BP
Eating food from cans lined with the chemical bisphenol A (BPA) could raise blood pressure, a new study suggests. The report was published online December 8 in the Hypertension. More...


Simple blood test could detect breast cancer long before symptoms appear - and spell the end of the mammogram
A metal-detecting blood test that can give vital early warning of breast cancer is being developed by Oxford University scientists. More...


Early bedtimes can lift the spirits: study
Night-owl students had more repetitive negative thoughts than other students, a new study out of SUNY Binghamton said. The findings 'could one day lead to a new avenue for treatment,' co-author Meredith Coles said. More...


84 % of US Vegetarians Abandon Diet, Study Shows
A recent study led by Human Research Council (HRC), a research group that vowed to reduce animal suffering, shows that 84 percent of US vegetarians give up their diet and turn back to eating meat. More...


We may be able to reverse signs of early Alzheimer's disease
In a study out of UCLA nine out of the 10 patients involved say their symptoms were reversed after they participated in a rigorous program. More...


Older Breast Cancer Patients Still Get Radiation Despite Lower Benefits
Women over the age of 70 who have certain early-stage breast cancer overwhelmingly receive radiation therapy despite published evidence that the treatment has limited benefit, researchers at Duke Medicine report. More...


Male smokers face greater cancer risk: Study
In a discovery that could possibly persuade smokers to quit, researchers at the Uppsala University in Sweden have found a strong association between smoking and the loss of the male Y chromosome in blood cells. More...


Time-Restricted Diet Reduces Weight Gain by 28%
A new mouse study shows that a longer time span between dinner and breakfast is associated with lower weight gain even on some high-fat diets. More...


Knee Surgery May Increase the Risk of Arthritis
A knee surgery may increase the risk of arthritis according to a recent study. More...


New Spinal Injury Drug Helps Regeneration of Nerve Cells: Paralyzed Lab Rats Showed Improvement
An experimental compound that can help regenerate nerve cells shows promise in animal tests and this could pave way for a new therapy that can restore movements in individuals paralyzed because of spinal cord injuries. More...


Eating the Mediterranean diet may lead to a longer life
Eating a Mediterranean diet may be your key to living longer. That's according to a new study led by Immaculata De Vivo, associate professor at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and Harvard Medical School. More...


Fatal ODs From Narcotic Painkillers Have Tripled in U.S.
The epidemic of prescription painkiller abuse continues to take a deadly toll in the United States, with fatal overdoses involving drugs such as Oxycontin and Vicodin tripling over a decade, a new report shows. More...


Diabetes in midlife linked to faster mental decline
Having diabetes in midlife appears to age the mind about five years faster than usual, scientists at Johns Hopkins University have found. More...


HIV losing its edge, evolving into milder form, study finds
One of the world's most feared virus is losing its edge. HIV is evolving to become less deadly and less infectious, according to a major scientific study led by British scientists. More...


Study: E-cigarettes contain 10 times more carcinogens than cigarettes
Researchers in Japan found that some brands of electronic cigarettes contain up to 10 times more carcinogens than traditional tobacco cigarettes. More...


Grey matter in brain behind Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia detected
Weakest spot or grey matter in brain behind Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia has been detected. This has ignited hope among medical fraternity More...


Eating Yogurt Reduces Type 2 Diabetes Risk, Perhaps Due To Probiotics' Effects
A new study from Harvard finds eating yogurt could lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, though the same is not true of other dairy foods. More...


Modern hand dryers spread more germs
Modern hand dryers are worse than paper towels when it comes to spreading germs, according to new University of Leeds research. More...


Toxic chemical linked to leukemia found in 'hookah smoke'
A new study has found that hookah smoke contains toxic benzene, which has been previously linked to an increased risk for leukemia. More...


Justice Department, Senate investigating generic drug price hikes
Some generic drugs on the market have skyrocketed in price in the last 18 months. More...


Bad marriage can ruin your heart, says study
Study finds that women's heart health seems to suffer more than men's when a couple is in an unhappy marriage More...


Jogging Beats Walking for Older Adults
A new study suggests that jogging helps older adults maintain their muscular efficiency more so than walking. More...


Researchers rediscover Brain's Major Pathway after disappearance of medical texts for Decades
A team of researchers claimed that it has tracked the complex history of a major pathway in the human brain. The neural pathway was not in medical textbooks for many years. More...


Consumer Watch: High Levels of Inorganic Arsenic Found in Rice
Consumer Reports analyzed Food and Drug Administration data on more than 600 foods that contain rice and found some with worrisome levels of inorganic arsenic. More...


Trans Fats in Processed Food May Cause Memory Loss
Researchers have warned that trans fat consumption could have harmful effects on the brain and are capable of damaging memory. More...


Soap Chemical may Cause Liver Tumors in Humans
Triclosan, a chemical found in soaps, shampoos, toothpaste and many other everyday household products causes liver fibrosis and cancer in animals. More...


One kiss can transfer 80 million bacteria
Kissing for 10 seconds may transfer as many as 80 million bacteria to a partner, according to a new study. More...


Energy Drinks Toxic to Kids
High-caffeine energy drinks can cause serious cardiac and neurological symptoms in children More...


Are Hospitals a Bad Place to Have a Heart Attack?
Patients who had the attacks while hospitalized for a non-cardiac ailment had a more than 3-fold greater in-hospital mortality than patients taken to a hospital. More...


ADHD Stimulant Drug Abuse Common Among Young Adults: Survey
Nearly one in every five college students abuses prescription stimulants, according to a new survey sponsored by the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. More...


Gene Mutations that Cut Risk of Heart Diseases discovered
Gene mutations that provide people naturally lower cholesterol levels and reduce their risk of heart disease by 50% have been discovered by scientists. More...


Contact Lens Related Microbial Keratitis Infection On The Rise in the U.S.
An eye infection called keratitis is on the rise in America. It is related to contact lens use. More...


Scientists Find Flame Retardant In Americans
Cancer causing chemical TCEP is found in the average American. CA has loosened regulations on flame retardants in furniture as a result. More...


U.S. Prices Soaring for Some Generic Drugs, Experts Say
Market forces are dramatically driving up the cost of some generic drugs, prompting U.S. investigations into the pricing of what should be cheap alternatives to brand-name medications. More...


Healthcare Bankrupt? Woman’s $300k Bill Over Health Insurance Networks
Patient with Obamacare insurance is hit with $300k in medical bills after her life is saved in an out-of-network hospital. More...


Warning over plastics used in treating premature babies
US researchers have warned that premature babies are being exposed to high levels of a potentially dangerous chemical in plastics. More...


Lab-Grown Neurons From Autistic Kids Could Lead to New Treatments
Scientists are collecting cells from the skin, blood, and teeth of autistic children and turning them into neurons in their labs. More...


Prostate cancer breakthrough as scientists STARVE tumours of their blood supply - stopping them growing and spreading
Scientists have developed a promising treatment for prostate cancer by starving tumours of their blood supply. More...


Obamacare 2015: Higher costs, higher penalties
Low-priced Obamacare plans will raise their rates in 2015, and penalties for failing to secure a health-insurance plan will rise steeply. More...


Video games are good for your brain, study claims, even first-person shooters
Players show improved performance in perception, attention and cognition. More...


Stem Cell Breakthrough May be the Cure for Parkinson's
Researchers from Lund University are looking at stem cell transplantation as a means to heal the damaged brain part caused by Parkinson's disease. More...


Breakthrough in unlocking the brain's potential by returning it to child-like state
Stanford researchers suppressed protein that allows you to remember skills, but which also hampers learning, in experiments on animals More...


New 'Stupidity Virus' Discovered, Scientists Say
Researchers from Johns Hopkins University and the University of Nebraska have discovered a virus that makes you just a little bit dumber. More...


Long-Term Marijuana Use Linked To Abnormalities In Key Brain Region
A new study conducted at The University of Texas at Dallas links heavy, long-term use of marijuana with smaller volume in the orbitofrontal cortex--a brain region associated with decision-making and addiction. More...


Laundry Detergent Pods Pose Poisoning Risk to Kids
One death, more than 700 illnesses among young U.S. children More...


Smoking Cigars Or Cigarettes Is Equally Harmful, Study Says
A new study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention found that smoking cigars may be just as harmful to health as smoking cigarettes. More...


Want to Get Ahead at Work? Get Healthy
People searching for candidates to run their organization prefer those with a healthy complexion, according to a study recently published in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. More...


Some Painkillers May Up Death Risk After Stroke
Arthritis pain relievers known as COX-2 inhibitors, including Celebrex and Lodine, are associated with an increased risk of dying within a month after a stroke, according to a new study. More...


Alarming finding: Rise in colon cancer cases in young adults
Colon cancer, like many other cancers, was thought to be a disease of the old. More...


Expectant Mothers Exposed To Air Pollution At Increased Risk Of Having A Child With ADHD
Now, recent findings published in the journal PLOS ONE reveal that expectant mothers exposed to air pollution can drastically increase the risk of giving birth to children with ADHD or other behavioral health issues. More...


Kidney Stone Prevention Includes an Easy Remedy
American College of Physicians (ACP) guidelines suggest sufferers drink approximately two liters of water daily. More...


Miami business owner sentenced in $74M Medicare fraud
The owner of two Miami health care companies was sentenced to more than seven years in prison Wednesday for participating in a $74 million Medicare fraud scheme. More...


Sleep apnoea tied to memory problems
Remembering locations and directions may suffer when deep sleep is disrupted by breathing difficulties. More...


Is Tau the How Behind Alzheimer's?
Malfunction of a key brain protein called tau is the likely culprit behind Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, a new study in mice concludes. More...


Weight-loss surgery reduces diabetes risk
Weight-loss surgery could reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by around 80 percent in obese people, says a study. More...


Number Of Americans Who Want Universal Government Health Care Has Plunged
After several years of Obamacare, the number of Americans that think the government should provide universal health coverage has dropped precipitously. More...


Breast Cancer Targets African-American Women at a Higher Rate
Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among African-American women and the leading cause of cancer death for African-American women ages 45 to 64 years old. More...


Can lots of sex protect the prostate?
Men who sleep with lots of women may be less likely to develop prostate cancer than men who don't play the field, a new Canadian study suggests. More...


Science proves that scratching an itch really does makes it worse
Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis revealed results from a study that proved that scratching triggers the brain into releasing serotonin, which, in turn, increases the sensation of itch. More...


3 daily glasses of milk linked to higher mortality rate in women
Study suggests that consuming three glasses of milk per day may double women’s risk of dying in 20 years More...


Prescription drugs account for majority of opioid-related ER visits: study
The majority of opioid-related visits to hospital emergency rooms are due to prescription drugs, according to a new study in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. More...


Ancient Virus Revived from 700-Year-Old Caribou Feces
Scientists have successfully brought a 700 year old virus back to life after it was found frozen in an ancient caribou feces. More...


Study: Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome have brain abnormalities
A study of 15 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome has found that patients' brains have at least three distinct abnormalities when compared to healthy people, researchers said today. More...


Compound in cocoa found to reverse age-related memory loss
A new study suggests that a natural compound found in cocoa, tea and some vegetables can reverse age-related memory loss. More...


Cancer-killing stem cells engineered in lab
Scientists from Harvard Medical School have discovered a way of turning stem cells into killing machines to fight brain cancer. More...


Beware: Toxic chemical on store receipts
A new study finds that high levels of bisphenol A (BPA), a controversial chemical, are absorbed into the skin from touching cash-register receipts. More...


Over-the-counter painkillers could help treat depression
Anti-inflammatory painkillers sold over the counter (like ibuprofen and aspirin) could help to treat depression, according to a new analysis. More...


Paralysed man walks again after pioneering surgery
Polish surgeons used nerve-supporting cells from the nose of Darek Fidyka to provide pathways along which the broken tissue was able to grow. More...


Genetic variant protects some Latina women from breast cancer
An international research collaboration led by UC San Francisco researchers has identified a genetic variant common in Latina women that protects against breast cancer. More...


Sugary drinks could age the body as much as SMOKING, scientists warn
Sugary soft drinks may accelerate ageing as much as smoking, new research shows. More...


What’s a ‘coffee nap?’ and should you take one?
Dubbed the “coffee nap,” researchers say drinking a cup of coffee and then immediately taking a brief, 20-mute nap, will result with you feeling more alert and rested than doing either independently. More...


Alcohol Intake Tied to Low Sperm Quality, High Testosterone
Alcohol intake is linked to lower sperm quality, according to a cross-sectional study of young Danish men published online October 2 in BMJ Open. More...


Exercising three times a week significantly cuts depression risk
Exercising three times a week reduces the odds of developing depression by around 16 percent, scientists said on Wednesday -- and for every extra weekly activity session, the risk drops further. More...


Broccoli Sprouts Chemical May Treat Autism
Results of a small clinical trial suggest that a chemical derived from broccoli sprouts — and best known for claims that it can help prevent certain cancers — may ease classic behavioral symptoms in those with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). More...


Radical new treatment for antibiotic resistant C. difficile
Due to antibiotic-resistant bacteria, a rise has been witnessed in C. difficile cases. Researchers are looking out for new ways to treat the infection. More...


Scientists Find the Brain Repairs Itself after a Stroke
A previously unknown mechanism that lets the brain create new neurons after a stroke has been uncovered by researchers from Lund University and Karolinska Istitutet in Sweden. More...


Ebola threatens chocolate supply
Ebola is threatening much of the world’s chocolate supply. More...


Drink decaf coffee for a healthy liver
Drinking decaffeinated coffee may benefit liver health, according to a new study. More...


Artificial Turf Linked to Cancer
NBC’s Nightly News aired scathing reports Wednesday and Thursday suggesting that artificial turf may cause cancer. More...


Grapefruit Juice May Help you Slim Down
Mice who drank grapefruit juice gained less weight than mice who drank sweetened water in a study at UC Berkeley. More...


Hospitals' High Antibiotic Use May Boost Germs' Resistance: Study
About half of all U.S. hospital patients receive antibiotics, and these drugs are commonly the ones more likely to promote the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, a new study found. More...


Study links BPA exposure of pregnant women to lung problems in kids
Bisphenol A (BPA) exposure during the pregnancy in women may increase the risk of lung problems in their children. More...


Heavy coffee drinker? Blame your genes, study suggests
In a giant analysis of 120,000 regular coffee drinkers from dozens of studies, scientists identified six new gene variations linked to coffee and caffeine consumption. More...


First Baby Is Born from Transplanted Womb
The first successful womb transplant surgery is performed in Sweden resulting in a baby boy for a Swedish mother. More...


US heroin deaths double in link to prescription painkillers, says CDC
The over-prescribing of painkillers is fuelling nearly 17,000 annual deaths from overdoses. More...


Mini-Strokes May Lead to PTSD, Study Finds
Fear, depression and anxiety might follow a transient ischemic attack, researchers say More...


Scientists: Weakening sense of smell a strong predictor of death
Olfactory dysfunction had a better chance of predicting mortality than a diagnosis of heart failure, lung disease or cancer. More...


How Exercise May Protect Against Depression
Exercise may help to safeguard the mind against depression through previously unknown effects on working muscles, according to a new study involving mice. More...


Social Support May Be Key to Heart Attack Recovery
Study found younger patients fared worse if they did not have family, friends to help afterwards More...


Roche breast cancer drug 'unprecedented' in extending lives
Patients with a type of breast cancer known as HER2 positive lived 15.7 months longer with Perjeta than those on Herceptin and chemotherapy alone. More...


Researchers detect early sign of pancreatic cancer
Years before they show any other signs of disease, pancreatic cancer patients have very high levels of certain amino acids in their bloodstream, according to a new study from MIT, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and the Broad Institute. More...


Cognitive Behavioral Therapy More Effective for Social Anxiety Disorder
According to a new study, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is more effective than medication for social anxiety disorder. More...


Doctors Advise IUD Use as Best Birth Control Method for Teenagers
A leading medical group on Monday recommended implantable rods and intrauterine devices (IUDs) as the best form of birth control for teenage girls other than abstinence. More...


1.8M Americans have chlamydia, report finds
Nearly 2 million people in the United States have the sexually transmitted disease (STD) chlamydia, according to new estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More...


Now, dementia maybe cured with 'turmeric'
Scientists have made a breakthrough in treating Alzheimer's disease and found that the spice turmeric could help beat dementia. More...


Can All Work and No Play Make You Diabetic?
Working long hours may increase your risk for diabetes, a new study suggests. But the finding seems to depend on your job. More...


Increasing skirt size linked to breast cancer risk
Women who gain weight around the waist and whose skirt sizes therefore increase between their 20s and 60s may be at higher risk of breast cancer after menopause, a new study from the United Kingdom suggests. More...


Multi-tasking makes your brain smaller: Grey matter shrinks if we do too much at once
A study found that men and women who frequently used several types of technology at the same time had less grey matter in a key part of the brain. More...


Scientists use stem cells to learn how common mutation in Asians affects heart health
'This study is one of the first to show that we can use iPS cells to study ethnic-specific differences among populations,' said Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, director of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute and professor of cardiovascular medicine and of radiology. More...


Fear of Losing Job Significantly Increases Risk of Developing Asthma: Study
Work-related stress increases the risk of developing asthma 60%. More...


Being Obese Increases Risk of Stress-Related Diseases, Study Finds
People who are obese or overweight are susceptible to risk of stress-related diseases like cancer, cardiovascular problems and type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. More...


More than 700 babies exposed to tuberculosis in Texas
Health officials in West Texas have begun testing some babies for tuberculosis because more than 700 infants at an El Paso hospital were exposed to a worker found to have the disease. More...


Iron Deficiency During Pregnancy Has Possible Link to Autism
An iron deficiency in women, especially those who are pregnant, may contribute to a child developing autism. More...


E-Cigarettes Won't Help Smokers Quit Says New Study
A new study published in the online journal, Cancer, says that e-cigarettes don’t assist smokers who want to kick the habit. More...


One Dose of Antidepressant Changes the Brain, Study Finds
One dose of antidepressant is all it takes to change the brain, finds a small new study published in the journal Current Biology. More...


Vaccine Mix-Up In Syria Not Uncommon In US, Canada
A 2005 report highlighted over 50 cases of neuromuscular blocking agent mixups which were potentially lethal. More...


Artificial Sweeteners Linked to Glucose Intolerance
The artificial sweeteners aspartame, sucralose, and saccharin cause blood glucose abnormalities in mice and some humans, a team reports in an article published online September 17 in Nature. More...


Pumpkin-Flavored Drinks contain Excessive Sugar, and no Natural Pumpkin Elements
About $300 million worth of pumpkin-flavored products are consumed by Americans every year, few of which contain any actual pumpkin. More...


Your Healthy Body is a Wonderland of Viruses
“Healthy” might be a misnomer. According to a new study from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, healthy humans can unknowingly house viruses in their bodies. More...


Plastic microbeads in Crest toothpaste are dangerous, warns dentist
The blue microbeads found in Crest toothpaste are made of a common plastic known as polyethylene, a non-biodegradable material that won't dissolve in the mouth. More...


New research finds link between sweeteners and diabetes
New research has shown artificial sweeteners may be doing more harm than good - with a surprising link to Type 2 diabetes. More...


Sit Less, Live Longer
Sitting less can slow the aging process within cells. More...


CDC study: Americans' bellies are expanding fast
The number of American men and women with big-bellied, apple-shaped figures - the most dangerous kind of obesity - has climbed at a startling rate over the past decade, according to a government study. More...


Study Ties Male Pattern Baldness to Higher Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer
A new study links a specific pattern of baldness in men to an elevated risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer later in life. More...


Study: Sunny Days May Boost Suicide Rate
A recent study has found a link between sunlight exposure and suicide rates; adding further evidence to previous studies. More...


Meditation Reduces Migraine: Study
A recent study has shown that the sufferers of migraine, chronic neurological disorder, might get relief by a type of meditation designed to reduce stress. More...


Professions that drink the most coffee
Teachers drink more coffee than plumbers, and journalists gulp the most of all. More...


Some people’s brains can adapt to Alzheimer’s protein, scientists say
Researchers from the University of California – Berkeley say that having a more adaptable brain might be the key to not developing dementia. More...


Scientists achieve human stem cells reset to embryonic stage
Scientists at the Medical Research Council of the Wellcome Trust from the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute have found a way to effectively reset human stem cells to its embryonic state. More...


Eat More Fish, Save Your Hearing?
Eating more fish may reduce a woman's risk for hearing loss, according to a large new study. More...


Sleeping pills taken by millions linked to Alzheimer's
Sleeping tablets and anxiety drugs taken by millions of people have been linked with Alzheimer's disease, researchers warn. More...


Salt Doesn’t Cause High Blood Pressure? Here’s What a New Study Says
A new study published in the American Journal of Hypertension found that salt consumption wasn’t associated with systolic blood pressure in either men or women. More...


Race and ethnicity important when evaluating risk of fat around the heart
A man's likelihood of accumulating fat around his heart – an important indicator of heart disease risk – may be better determined if doctors consider his race and ethnicity, as well as where on his body he's building up excess fat, reveals an international evaluation led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. More...


Autism study suggests parents could treat early symptoms at home
A new study suggests children showing early signs of Autism Spectrum Disorder could be treated at home by parents, if symptoms are diagnosed quickly enough. More...


Support for ObamaCare continues to fall
Just 35 percent of voters now support the Affordable Care Act, down 3 percentage points from May. More...


A virus can spread around an entire building within just hours of contaminating one surface
A virus can spread around a whole building within two hours of coming into contact with just one surface, a new study has found. More...


Infection Risk Increases wih Each Day of Hospitalisation
Infection risk in patients increases by 1 percent each day of hospitalization, a new research reveals. More...


Scientists Transmit Thoughts from one Brain to Another
An international team of scientists has succeeded in transmitting the thoughts of one individual into the brain of a second person, located thousands of miles away, combining some of the latest technological marvels with the long arm of the Internet. More...


Smoking Cannabis More harmful to Women than Men
In a recent study, researchers revealed that smoking cannabis is more harmful to women than men. More...


Obesity rates reach historic highs in more US states
Rates of adult obesity increased in six U.S. states and fell in none last year, and in more states than ever - 20 - at least 30% of adults are obese, according to an analysis released on Thursday. More...


Little Evidence of Testosterone Drugs' Benefits or Risks: FDA
There is little evidence that testosterone drugs are beneficial. One study indicated a 30% higher risk of stroke, heart attack, and death, another showed they double the risk of heart attack. More...


Eating potassium-rich food may lower stroke risk
For older women, eating potassium-rich foods may reduce the risk of having a stroke, a new study finds. More...


Poor Quality Sleep May Be Linked to Shrinking Brain
Not getting a good night's sleep might be linked to shrinkage of the brain's gray matter over time, new research suggests. More...


Double mastectomy 'doesn't boost chance of surviving cancer': Women who have less drastic surgery live just as long
After ten years, the survival rate was the same at 81% whether they had a double mastectomy or less invasive lumpectomies. More...


Rural hospitals pressured to close as healthcare system changes
Rural communities are being pressured to cut costs and release patients sooner. The Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, is bringing additional pressure More...


States To Help Pay Obamacare Tax On Insurers
$8 billion tax on insurers due Sept. 30. Private insurers are passing the tax onto policyholders in the form of higher premiums. More...


Second-hand smoke from e-cigarettes contains toxic metals, researchers say
Breathing in second-hand smoke from e-cigarettes can be compared to exposure to regular tobacco cigarette smoke. More...


Scientists say you can 'retrain' your brain to be addicted to healthy food instead of junk
New research has shown that it’s possible to ‘retrain’ the brain to be addicted to low-calorie fare instead of junk food. More...


Low carb diet better than low fat diet for weight loss, good heart
Findings of a new study suggest that people whose diet is low in carbohydrates and high in fat tend to lose more weight and have lower cardiovascular risks compared with people who adopt a low-fat diet. More...


Whistleblower reveals CDC cover-up linking MMR vaccine to autism
A CDC whistleblower has come forward with information previously withheld from the public regarding the increased risk of autism in African American children linked to the MMR vaccine. More...


Drug OD deaths in NYC jump by 41%
Increase driven by rise in use of heroin and prescription painkillers More...


Electromagnetic stimulation may boost memory
Brain stimulation through electromagnetic pulses may help improve memory, according to new research. More...


MERS Virus Doesn't Spread Easily: Study
Patients infected with the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus are unlikely to pass it to others easily, according to a new study. More...


MIT Scientists Use Lasers to Replace Bad Memories with Good Ones in Mice
Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientists have used lasers to replace bad memories with good ones in animal test models. More...


Bacteria study offers hope in fight against food allergies
The secret to minimizing allergies may lie in you gut, researchers find. More...


Exercise for the heart may also protect the mind
A new study from Canada that found links between aerobic fitness and brain function in older adults. More...


WHO Urges Tighter Regulation of E-Cigarettes
The World Health Organization is calling for the stricter regulation of electronic cigarettes, including banning the sale of devices to minors and from use indoors. More...


DEA Restricts Narcotic Pain Drug Prescriptions
The Obama administration moved Thursday to restrict prescriptions of the most commonly used narcotic painkillers in the U.S. in an attempt to curb widespread abuse. More...


90% of hospitals and clinics lose their patients' data
Recent numbers show 90% of health care organizations have exposed their patients' data -- or had it stolen -- in 2012 and 2013, according to privacy researchers at the Ponemon Institute. More...


Common Infections Tied to Some Stroke Risk in Kids
A new study suggests that colds and other minor infections may temporarily increase stroke risk in children. More...


Warning Of Nicotine-Poisoning Threat From E-Cigarette Liquid
Two Connecticut lawmakers on Tuesday announced a drive in Congress to require child-proof bottles of liquid nicotine used for e-cigarettes. More...


Vitamin D Linked to IVF Success
Low serum levels of vitamin D may impair a woman's chances of conceiving through in vitro fertilization (IVF), according to the results of a large, prospective, cross-sectional study. More...


Childhood Disabilities Have Increased by 21 Percent: Study Confirms
The number of children dealing with neurodevelopmental or mental health problems has increased by nearly 21 percent More...


Report: CDC scientist kept quiet about flu blunder
Scientist revealed mistake only after other employees noticed it. More...


Cancer Treatment: Bacteria injection shrinks tumors in human patient
In a ray of hope for treating cancers, US-based scientists have successfully shrunk cancer tumors in pet dogs, rats and one human patient by simply injecting common soil bacteria. More...


Antibiotics may mess with your baby's metabolism
If young mice are given antibiotics early in life, they have a greater chance of becoming obese, a new study out of NYU Langone Medical Center found. More...


Poor sleep could increase suicide risk in the elderly
A study conducted on people who are more than 65 year old has suggested that those who have trouble sleeping are 40% more likely to commit to suicide in the next 10 years. More...


Increase Exposure to Phthalates Reduces Testosterone Levels
A recent study reports that exposure to high levels of phthalates leads to lower levels of testosterone in the blood of men, women and children as compared to those who have low phthalate’s exposure. More...


Pour on the Salt? New Research Suggests More Is OK
New research suggests that healthy people can eat about twice the amount of salt that’s currently recommended — or about as much as most people consume anyway. The controversial findings could potentially undercut widespread public health messages about salt. More...


Chemical used in Colgate Total linked to cancer
A chemical that has been linked to cancer cell growth is being used by millions of Americans in toothpaste every day, it has emerged, according to a report of Daily Mail Online. More...


In Cancer Survivors, Colonoscopy Risks Rise with Age
Older patients were 28% more likely than younger ones to be hospitalized for treatment of complications following a surveillance colonoscopy, study data shows. More...


Concussions from top-of-head impact 'more severe'
A recent study from the American Academy of Pediatrics investigates how the location of impact could affect concussion severity. More...


US State to Quarantine Ebola-exposed Missionaries
The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services said anyone returning from Africa who worked with Ebola patients will be put into quarantine. More...


Ingredients in Antibacterial Soap Could Put Fetuses at Risk
Researchers say pregnant women and fetuses exposed to common ingredients found in antibacterial soaps and other germ-killing products could suffer health risks More...


Breast Cancer Risk in Post-Menopausal Women Reduced With Exercise
Regular exercises reduce breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women, a research suggests. More...


This bug’s bite could turn you into a vegetarian
The Lone Star tick bite can make you allergic to meat or dairy. More...


Warning: Neck Adjustments Might Lead To Stroke
After a neck adjustment — also known as cervical manipulative therapy and typically employed by chiropractors and other healthcare providers — people are at increased risk for cervical dissections (tears), which can lead to stroke, according to a scientific statement released by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. More...


Physical fitness in middle-school girls keeps depression at bay
A new study conducted by a team led by Camilo Ruggero, from the University of North Texas, however, suggests that one feasible way of reducing the risks of children from getting depressed is to get them physically fit. More...


Your gut bacteria could show your risk for cancer
Gut bacteria analysis may improve identification of those who are at risk for, or already have, colon cancer. More...


Low vitamin D levels may predict dementia risk
Elderly people with less vitamin D in their blood may be more likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer’s disease than those with more, according to a new analysis of data from the mid-1990’s. More...


Bad ink: FDA warns of skin infections from tattoo kits & inks
The Food and Drug Administration is warning consumers and tattoo artists about certain kinds of tattoo inks that may have bacterial contamination. More...


Feds stop public disclosure of many serious hospital errors
The federal government this month quietly stopped publicly reporting when hospitals leave foreign objects in patients' bodies or make a host of other life-threatening mistakes. More...


Life expectancy gap between blacks and whites in the U.S. varies considerably across states
Nationally the black-white difference in life expectancy for males is 5.4 years and for females is 3.8 years. More...


Eating fish once a week boosts brain health
Eating baked or broiled fish once a week can make the brain healthier, regardless of how much omega-3 fatty acid it contains, according to a new study. More...


A little video gaming linked to well-adjusted children
Playing video games for a short period each day could have a small but positive impact on child development, a study by Oxford University suggests. More...


The Pill linked to breast cancer risk for younger women
A new statistical analysis finds that women under age 50 who were diagnosed with breast cancer were also more likely to have recently been on some versions of the Pill. More...


Johnson & Johnson Withdraw Device Linked to Spreading of Cancer
Johnson & Johnson have just announced that they are planning to urge doctors to return their power morcellators that may be linked to the spreading of cancer in women who are treated for fibroids (uterine growths). More...


New study provides insight into relationship between depression and dementia
A new study by neuropsychiatric researchers at Rush University Medical Center gives insight into the relationship between depression and dementia. The study is published in the July 30, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. More...


Weather kills 2,000 a year; cold is top culprit
The weather kills at least 2,000 Americans each year and nearly two-thirds of the deaths are from the cold, according to a new government report. More...


A Cooler Bedroom May Boost Metabolism
A new study has found that turning the thermostat down a few notches at night may expand brown fat tissue mass and activity, which could lead to metabolic benefits such as more effective disposal of glucose. More...


Fist bump much better for health than handshake: study
According to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, tapping knuckles transmits significantly fewer bacteria than either handshaking or high-fiving. More...


Running Could Add 3 Years to Your Lifespan
Just 5 to 10 minutes a day seems to bring benefits, study says More...


Acetaminophen No More Effective than Placebo for Acute Back Pain
Australian investigators found that paracetamol (acetaminophen) for acute low-back pain was no more effective than placebo in a large randomized trial. More...


Schizophrenia: Scientists tie over 80 new genes to mental illness
In one of the largest studies ever conducted to investigate the genetic origins of schizophrenia, scientists have found 83 new gene variants that are associated with the disease. More...


Federal appeals court panel ruling is setback to health care law
A federal appeals court dealt a potentially major blow to President Obama’s health care law Tuesday, ruling that participants in health exchanges run by the federal government in 34 states are not eligible for tax subsidies. More...


3D printing used to control stem cell differentiation
Scientists from Rockefeller University are using principles from geometry to control the patterns through which human embryonic stem cells develop. More...


Genes May Raise Risk of Cerebral Palsy, Study Finds
New research suggests that genes may play a role in cerebral palsy, the most common cause of physical disability in children. More...


Gays, Lesbians Face Certain Health Challenges, U.S. Report Says
The study found they were more likely to smoke cigarettes and more likely to consume five or more alcoholic beverages in one day. More...


New brain protein tied to Alzheimer's disease
Scientists have linked a new protein to Alzheimer's disease, different from the amyloid and tau that make up the sticky brain plaques and tangles long known to be its hallmarks. More...


Hospital Elevator Buttons Often Source of Bacteria
Hospital elevator buttons are more frequently colonized with certain bacteria than some restroom surfaces. More...


Utah Doc Loses License to Prescribe Narcotics by Telemedicine
A Utah doctor who practices telemedicine from an island in the western Pacific Ocean was stripped earlier this month of his license to prescribe controlled substances for allegedly failing to properly evaluate 3 of his patients. More...


Study: U.S. Alzheimer's rate appears to be dropping
The rate of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is falling in the United States and some other rich countries. More...


Friends have more DNA in common than strangers
People may unsuspectingly choose friends who have some DNA sequences in common with them, a new analysis finds. More...


DEA probing alleged prescription drug abuse in NFL
The DEA is launching an investigation into claims that NFL players illegally have been given powerful painkillers, among other prescription drugs, to keep them on the field, according to a source with knowledge of the investigation. More...


Alabama VA falsifications continued even after caught
The Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System pulmonologist who falsified more than 1,200 patient records kept doing it even after he was caught, and even when he was caught again, little was done to discipline him, according to the U.S. Office of Special Counsel. More...


Stress eating linked to 11-pound weight gain a year, study shows
Researchers found that women who experienced stress in the previous 24 hours burned 104 fewer calories than non-stressed women in the time after eating a high-fat meal. More...


Sleep disorders may raise risk of Alzheimer’s, new research shows
Sleep disturbances such as apnea may increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, while moderate exercise in middle age and mentally stimulating games, such as crossword puzzles, may prevent the onset of the dementia-causing disease, according to new research to be presented Monday. More...


IPad tied to boy's nickel allergy
The iPad is a potential source of nickel allergy reactions, say pediatricians who suggest parents choose a metal-free cover for the electronics. More...


Study of Organic Crops Finds Fewer Pesticides and More Antioxidants
Adding fuel to the debates over the merits of organic food, a comprehensive review of earlier studies found substantially higher levels of antioxidants and lower levels of pesticides in organic fruits, vegetables and grains compared with conventionally grown produce. More...


Organic food may help prevent cancer: Study
Organic foods and crops have a suite of advantages over their conventional counterparts, including more antioxidants, fewer, less frequent pesticide residues, and properties that may help prevent cancer, a study suggests. More...


C.D.C. Closes Anthrax and Flu Labs After Accidents
After potentially serious back-to-back laboratory accidents, federal health officials announced Friday that they had temporarily closed the flu and anthrax laboratories at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta and halted shipments of all infectious agents from the agency’s highest-security labs. More...


Some Teens May Face Emotional Problems After Concussion
Teens who are sensitive to light or noise after a concussion are more likely to develop emotional symptoms such as anxiety and depression, a new study says. More...


WHO says all gay men should take antiretroviral medicine to combat 'exploding epidemics' of HIV
The World Health Organization has a new proposal for preventing the spread of HIV: suggesting that all gay men take preventive medicine for the disease. More...


Drink less to keep your heart healthy
Reducing the amount of alcoholic beverages consumed, even for light-to-moderate drinkers, may promote cardiovascular health, according to a new study by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. More...


Like in Humans, Genes Drive Half of Chimp Intelligence, Study Finds
A large study of chimps finds certain aspects of intelligence are more heritable than others. More...


Same genes drive mathematics and reading ability
About half of the genes that influence how well a child can read also play a role in their mathematics ability, say scientists who led a study into the genetic basis of cognitive traits. More...


Scientists 'switch off' consciousness in a patient's brain
For the first time, researchers have been able to switch off consciousness in a woman by electrically stimulating a single brain area. More...


A prosthetic for the brain could restore a soldier’s lost memory
Prosthetics may no longer be limited to external limbs, if the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s project to restore memories lost from traumatic brain injury (TBI) gets positive results. More...


Adults With Serious Mental Illnesses Face 80% Unemployment
Employment rates for people with a serious mental illness are dismally low and getting worse, according to a report from the National Alliance on Mental Illness. More...


Old Smallpox Vials Found in Lab Scares US Authorities
U.S. authorities are scrambling to find out why and how old vials of the once-deadly smallpox virus were kept in a laboratory in Bethesda, Maryland where they weren't supposed to be. More...


Severe obesity can cut nearly 14 years off your life
People who are severely obese may lose as many as 14 years off their life, a new study suggests. More...


'Remote-control' contraceptive implant developed backed by Bill Gates
A remote-controlled contraceptive chip which is implanted under the skin has been developed with the backing of Bill Gates and would last for 16 years More...


Less Exercise, Not More Calories, Causes Expanding Waistlines
Sedentary lifestyle and not caloric intake may be to blame for increased obesity in the U.S., according to a new analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). More...


Nanojuice may just help diagnose those tummy ailments a bit easier and quicker
Nanojuice may help diagnose irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease, Crohn's disease and other gastrointestinal issues in a quick and easier fashion. More...


Dark chocolate may ease artery disease impact, improve walking ability
Dark chocolate lovers and chocolate makers will likely celebrate the results of a small study that indicates dark chocolate could help those suffering from artery disease. More...


Lead in preschool kids' blood tied to behavioral problems
A new study shows that emotional and behavioral problems are apparent even at relatively low levels of lead exposure in preschool children, and they go up in line with rising blood lead levels. More...


Less Sleep Pushes Your Brain to Age Faster
Researchers find connection between sleep deprivation and a marker of aging brains More...


Studies: Maternal aid wasted abroad
Billions of dollars have been spent trying to save the lives of mothers in developing countries yet two large analyses of maternal health programs - including one conducted by the U.N. itself - report that the efforts appeared almost useless More...


Chronic Migraine Puts Heavy Burden on Families
Suffering chronic migraines takes a huge toll on family life, a new study suggests. More...


Vitamin D may play into blood pressure, hypertension issues, claims new research
Low levels of vitamin D could play a factor in blood pressure and related health issues, according to a new research report published in the journal The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. More...


Study: Alcohol cutting down more Americans in their prime
Alcohol accounts for one in 10 working-age deaths nationwide, mostly men, and cuts lives short by as many as three decades, federal health officials reported Thursday. More...


Getting pregnant naturally after 33 linked to longer life expectancy: Study
Women who have children when they're older and don't require fertility treatments are more likely to have longer lifespans, a new U.S. study has found. More...


Watching TV for three or more hours every day can cause premature death, says study
If you watch television for three hours or more everyday, you may die prematurely. More...


Being Intellectual, Studying and Learning Lifelong Might Prevent From Dementia
Challenging the mind early with education and stimulating work and later in life with reading, socializing and computer use may help keep it thinking clearly into old age, according to new research. More...


Researchers Find Genetic Link Between Schizophrenia and Marijuana-Use
People who are genetically predisposed to developing schizophrenia are also more likely to use marijuana. More...


Indoor Tanning in Teens Ups the Risk of Skin Cancer, Study Finds
New research found that early exposure to the ultraviolet radiation lamps used for indoor tanning increased the risk of developing skin cancer. More...


Autism Rates Higher Among Certain Immigrants, Minorities
Condition Was Long Believed More Prevalent Among White Children in U.S. More...


Study: Green coffee bean extract leads to significant weight loss.
Study participants lost an average of 17 pounds during the study, and also had a slightly lower heart rate. More...


Offspring autism risk linked to pesticide exposure during pregnancy
A new study from the MIND Institute at the University of California-Davis suggests that expectant mothers who live near fields and farms where chemical pesticides are applied are at increased risk of having a child with autism More...


Nestle takes step toward customizable vitamins
Nestle said on Monday it was working on a new research project that could one day lead to the development of made-to-measure vitamin combinations tailored to an individual's needs. More...


Chikungunya virus spreads to U.S., Cuba
The debilitating virus has been spreading in the Caribbean through infected mosquitoes since December, according to the World Health Organization. More...


Gene Mutations Protect Against Heart Disease
Researchers have discovered four rare gene mutations that not only lower the levels of triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, but also significantly reduce a person's risk of coronary heart disease — dropping it by 40% More...


Deaths from prescribed painkillers 'higher than heroin and cocaine combined'
Prescription painkillers operate by binding to brain receptors and decreasing perceived pain. But these drugs can also create a sense of euphoria, causing physical dependence and addiction. In the first ever review of existing research into the topic, researchers have uncovered exactly how much deaths due to such drugs - which outnumber deaths from heroin and cocaine combined - have increased. More...


Dr. Oz defends green coffee, raspberry ketone, garcinia cambogia
'I do personally believe in the items that I talk about on the show,' says Dr Oz. More...


The U.S. healthcare system: worst in the developed world
The U.S. healthcare system ranks last among 11 developed countries, according to a new study by the Commonwealth Fund. (Commonwealth Fund) More...


Too much sitting may raise risk for certain cancers, study finds
A new study suggests that people who spend the bulk of their day sitting -- whether behind the wheel, in front of the TV or working at a computer -- appear to have an increased risk for certain kinds of cancers. More...


Vitamin A Derivative Might Treat Diabetes Type-2 and Obesity
Retinoic acid (RA) - a derivative of Vitamin A - can help treat obesity and diabetes type-2, researchers say. More...


Washing raw chicken increases risk of food poisoning
Washing raw chicken can lead to a potentially dangerous form of food poisoning caused by Campylobacter bacteria, which spread onto hands, clothing, cooking utensils and work surfaces as water droplets splash off the raw meat. Now, the UK's Food Standards Agency is urging people to stop washing raw chicken in an effort to reduce the estimated 280,000 people a year who become ill from Campylobacter. More...


Caffeine Affects Teen Boys, Girls Differently, Study Says
Kids appear to process caffeine -- the stimulant in coffee, energy drinks and soda -- differently after puberty. Males then experience greater heart-rate and blood-pressure changes than females, a new study suggests. More...


Stroke risk lowered with a high-protein diet
A new or recurrent stroke occurs in around 795,000 Americans every year and causes approximately 137,000 deaths. But new research published in the journal Neurology suggests a diet higher in protein may reduce stroke risk. More...


Diabetes 2 on the Rise
One in four people with diabetes doesn’t know they have the disease, according to a recent CDC report. More...


FDA retreats after uproar over cheese boards
The Food and Drug Administration raised a stink this week when it claimed that the use of wooden boards to age cheese - something that's been done for centuries - was unsanitary. More...


Lifetime costs for autism spectrum disorder may reach $2.4 million per patient, Penn study finds
Costs for a lifetime of support for each individual with autism spectrum disorder may reach $2.4 million, according to a new study from researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. More...


Statins linked to less exercise in aging population
A New Study Has Found That Use Of Statins Is Linked To Reduced Physical Activity In Older Men. More...


Perms, dyes linked to concerning compounds in hairdressers
In a new study, hairdressers who often used light colored hair dyes or hair-waving products on clients had more potentially cancer-causing compounds in their blood than hairdressers who used the chemicals less frequently. More...


Taking tomato pill daily benefits people with heart disease: Study
A recent study has revealed that taking a 'tomato pill' everyday may benefit people who are suffering with heart diseases. More...


Exercise Increases Diversity of Good Bacteria in a Person’s Gut
The new study by the University College of Cork reveals exercise can increase the percentage of good bacteria in a person's gut, which might help in keeping obesity at bay. More...


Insufficient exercise may compromise survival rates for breast cancer patients
Breast cancer patients who don’t get sufficient levels of exercise may experience a decreased quality of life and compromised survival rates, Medical News Today reported. More...


Study finds memories made during sleep
Sleep can significantly increase memory, study shows. More...


Fasting kick-starts stem cells into immune system rejuvenation mode, says new research
Fasting for three days can kick-start stem cells into a rejuvenation mode that can bolster the immune system, especially for the elderly and those undergoing chemotherapy, according to new research from University of Southern California. More...


Mad cow disease-related death confirmed in Texas
Mad cow disease has caused a fourth death in the United States, health officials say. More...


Sleep's memory role discovered
The mechanism by which a good night's sleep improves learning and memory has been discovered by scientists. More...


Treat soda same as tobacco: Study
A Recent Study Has Asked Authorities To Treat Soda Same As Tobacco With The Aim To Curb The Growing Obesity Epidemic. More...


Study documents MERS' spread from camel to human
Researchers studied the illness of a 44-year-old camel owner in Saudi Arabia, who died in November of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS. More...


Medicaid Enrollment Has Exploded Under Obamacare
ore than one in five Americans are now enrolled in the federal Medicaid program, according to new data released by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services on Wednesday. More...


Men Feel More Pain After Major Surgeries, Study Finds
An Austrian study involving more than 10,000 people found that men experience more pain after major surgery, while women report feeling more pain following minor procedures, such as biopsies. More...


Three-parent babies called 'not unsafe' as human trials planned
Scientists conclude that techniques used to create three-parent babies are not unsafe and call for experimentation on human embryos More...


Learning a second language in adulthood can slow brain ageing
Speaking two languages benefits the aging brain, according to new research, and it can be just as beneficial to learn one later in life as in childhood. More...


Personalized therapy helped women with advanced cervical cancer
A new type of personalized cancer therapy in which immune cells are harvested from patients' tumors, grown in the lab and infused back into patients showed dramatic results in a small, government-led trial in women with advanced cervical cancer, U.S. researchers said on Monday. More...


Green tea component upsets cancer cell metabolism
A new study reveals how an active component of green tea disrupts the metabolism of cancer cells in pancreatic cancer, offering an explanation for its effect on reducing risk of cancer and slowing its progression. The researchers believe the discovery signals a new approach to studying cancer prevention. More...


Cynicism linked to greater dementia risk, study says
Negative thinking might actually hurt your health. More...


Scientists Use Laser Lights to Regrow Teeth
Scientists have a new way to repair teeth, and they say their concept - using laser light to entice the body's own stem cells into action - may offer enormous promise beyond just dentistry in the field of regenerative medicine. More...


29% of World Population Is Overweight or Obese
The obesity epidemic is global: 2.1 billion people, or about 29% of the world's population, were either overweight or obese in 2013 More...


Psychiatric risks differ for boys and girls: brain blood flow diverges in puberty
Though cerebral blood flow levels decrease in the same way for both boys and girls before puberty, new research reveals that they differ significantly during puberty; levels increase in females and decrease in males. Researchers say their findings give clues to sex-specific susceptibilities to certain psychiatric disorders, such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia. More...


Stressful Social Relations May Result in Earlier Death: Study
Worries, conflicts and demands in relationships with partner, children, other relatives, friends and neighbors are linked with increased mortality risk among middle-aged men and women, a new Danish study published on the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health suggests. More...


Mental Illness Linked to Shortened Life Spans
Poor mental health can affect longevity as much or more than heavy smoking, study finds More...


Why Olive Oil Is So Good For The Heart
New research in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences looks at the effect of the Mediterranean diet on heart health and why olive oil and greens are together so beneficial for the heart. More...


Triclosan Ban: Minnesota Outlaws Chemical Found in Antibacterial Soaps!
A ban on triclosan, the germ-killing agent that is found in antibacterial soaps and antifungal ointments, has been put into effect in Minnesota. More...


Unhealthy diets greater threat to health than tobacco, says UN expert
Unhealthy diets pose a greater risk to global health than the increasingly regulated sale of tobacco and governments should move fast to tax harmful food products, a United Nations investigator said on Monday. More...


New Treatment for MS: Mice Walk Again After Therapy with Human Stem Cells
Scientists have found that after treating severely disabled mice with human stem cells, they could walk less than two weeks following the procedure. More...


Pool chemicals injure nearly 5,000 yearly
A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says in 2012 nearly 5,000 people in the United States visited an emergency department for injuries from pool chemicals, More...


FDA warns Lunesta sleeping pill users: Take half the dosage
The Food and Drug Administration warned that anyone prescribed the sleeping medication Lunesta might want to start their dosages at half strength, to about 1 milligram. More...


Lung cancer screening could cost Medicare billions
A new study estimates that it would cost Medicare about $2 billion a year to screen certain current and former heavy smokers for lung cancer. More...


Breakfast cereals loaded with too much sugar for U.S. kids -report
U.S. children are consuming more than 10 pounds (4.5 kgs) of sugar annually if they eat a typical morning bowl of cereal each day, contributing to obesity and other health problems. More...


Major U.S. Health Plans Agree to Give Consumers Free Access to Timely Information About Health Care Prices to Foster Greater Transparency
Health Care Cost Institute to Develop Online Platform to Help Consumers, Employers and Regulators Examine the Price and Quality of Health Care Services More...


Couric narrates film that takes on food industry
A new movie co-produced and narrated by television host Katie Couric accuses the food industry and federal government of playing a major role in the nation's obesity epidemic. More...


Kids' concussion symptoms can emerge later, linger for weeks
Kids who suffer a concussion can have lingering effects long after the physical symptoms fade away, U.S. researchers report. More...


Impairment from solvents might last decades
In the workplace, fumes from solvents such as paints, glues, degreasers and adhesives have been implicated in cognitive damage - in other words, impaired thinking and memory abilities. More...


Robot hand and arm gets official approval
A robot arm capable of picking up delicate objects has been approved for use by the FDA. More...


Forget fighting the fat, it's sugar that is causing massive rates of obesity claims new film
80 per cent of the 600,000 food products in America have added sugar. A third of adults will have diabetes by 2050 if nothing is done, film predicts. More...


Electrical stimulation of brain alters dreams: study
Scientists on Sunday said they had used a harmless electrical current to modify sleep so that an individual has 'lucid dreams,' a particularly powerful form of dreaming. More...


Anti-Aging Gene Helps Boost Brain Power
People who have a variant of a longevity gene, called KLOTHO, have enhanced cognitive abilities, according to a recent study Counsel and Heal reported. More...


Fruits and Veggies May Cut Stroke Risk
Eating more fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of stroke worldwide, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke. More...


New immunotherapy treatment uses patient's own cells to attack cancer
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health said they successfully attacked a woman's disease by using her immune system to home in on genetic mutations unique to her tumors More...


Many Hospitals Do Too Many C-sections
A Consumer Reports analysis of over 1,500 hospitals in 22 U.S. states suggests that some hospitals are doing 500% more c-sections. More...


Constant arguing 'increases premature death risk'
Having frequent arguments with partners, friends or relatives can increase the risk of death in middle-age, say Danish researchers. More...


Vermont governor signs GMO food labeling into law
Vermont's governor on Thursday signed a bill into law that will require the labeling of genetically modified foods -- hailing it as the first such law in the nation. More...


Teen Pregnancy Rates Hit Historic Lows
The Guttmacher Institute, a reproductive health research and policy advocacy group, released a report this week analyzing public health and birth certificate data from 2010. More...


Stop taking aspirin to cut heart risk
The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has warned the public in a statement that most people shouldn't take aspirin to prevent heart attacks. More...


A daily cup of coffee can prevent eye damage, study finds
Researchers analyzed the effects of chlorogenic acid on the retina of lab mice, and found that it reduced the risk of retinal degeneration. More...


Big Pharma's big cancer bet
$91 billion the world spent on cancer drugs last year, with 41% of those sales coming from the US. More...


Victim of violent attack transforms into math genius: What doctors are saying
Jason Padgett became a mathematical genius after suffering a serious brain injury as a result of a savage beating. More...


Minority Kids With Autism and Trouble With Walking
Minority children with autism are more likely to have lost critical developmental skills, such as walking or talking, than are white children, according to a new study. More...


Could Energy Drinks Be Wrong Choice for Some Teens?
Unhealthy behaviors may be more common in those who consume the beverages, research suggests More...


Young blood makes old mice more youthful
A blood-based protein that can rejuvenate the hearts of aging mice, has a similar effect on the mice's brain and skeletal muscle function, according to scientists at Harvard University. More...


Study: Kids' diabetes rates increase dramatically
The prevalence of type 1 diabetes increased 21 percent between 2001 and 2009. At the same time, rates of type 2 diabetes rose 30.5 percent, the study found. More...


CDC: 5 things cause two-thirds of U.S. deaths
Five things kill more people in the United States than anything else: heart disease, cancer, lung disease such as emphysema and chronic bronchitis, stroke and unintentional injuries such as those on roads or caused by medication overdoses. More...


Potential stroke therapy: stem cells from teeth form brain-like cells
Researchers have found that stem cells from teeth grow to resemble brain cells, a discovery they say could be harnessed in the brain for stroke therapy. More...


It's getting safer to be a child in the US
Study: 27 categories of 50 indicators of violence, crime improved for kids More...


Drug Resistance Found Worldwide, New Drugs Needed
Bacteria resistant to antibiotics have now spread to every part of the world and might lead to a future where minor infections could kill, according to a report published Wednesday by the World Health Organization. More...


High doses of antidepressants 'double chances of suicidal behaviour in teens'
High starting doses of antidepressants such as Prozac have been linked to increased suicidal behaviour in children and young adults, say scientists. More...


High-fiber diet may help heart attack survivors live longer: Study
A new study suggests that heart attack survivors who want to live longer can also benefit from adding more fiber to their diet. More...


Autistic children suffer more digestive issues, says new study
Deeper investigation is needed when it comes to gastronomical issues among autistic children as the population is more than four times likely to suffer from digestive troubles, according to a new medical research review. More...


High doses of antidepressants linked to suicide behavior in younger patients
Children and young adults who start taking antidepressants at high doses are more likely to think about or attempt suicide than those who start at the doses of antidepressants that are typically prescribed, according to a new study. More...


Exposure to violence declining among children, teens: study
Despite frequent media reports of school shootings and child abuse, a new analysis says the amount of violence U.S. children are exposed to fell considerably during the past decade. More...


Walking may spark creative thinking
New research finds that stretching one's legs really does give a mental boost More...


Study: Costly Breast Cancer Treatment More Common At For-Profit Hospitals
Older breast cancer patients who received radiation treatment after surgery were more likely to undergo a more expensive and somewhat controversial type of radiation called brachytherapy if they got their care at for-profit rather than nonprofit hospitals, a new study reports. More...


Death Rates From Pancreatic Cancer Continue To Climb
Death rates in Europe from pancreatic cancer continue to increase in both men and women in 2014–lung cancer is noted to be increasing in females as well. More...


1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds
More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows. More...


Marijuana ups heart risk in adults
Researchers have claimed that marijuana use may result in cardiovascular-related complications - even death - among young and middle-aged adults. More...


Bowel Illnesses Sometimes Coincide in Kids
Children with irritable bowel syndrome were more likely to also have celiac disease in Italian study More...


Low Vitamin D Levels in Pregnant Women Leads to Higher Cavities in Kids
A new study has found link between low vitamin D levels in women during pregnancy and a higher risk of cavities in the teeth of their toddlers. More...


Melanoma rates rising since the 70s
The rates of people diagnosed with malignant melanoma are five times higher than in the 1970s, although survival from the disease has increased markedly. More...


Scientists closer to cloning human embryos from adult stem cells
It's relatively easy to clone embryos from the adult stem cells of simpler animals like sheep, but humans have proved challenging. More...


Codeine given to kids despite warning, study finds
A new report warns of kids being treated with the powerful painkiller codeine. The American Academy of Pediatrics finds emergency room doctors prescribe codeine to children more than 500,000 times per year. More...


Gastric Bypass Patients' Sense of Smell and Taste Changed Post-Procedure
A new study has revealed that people who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery experienced changes in their sense of smell and taste post-procedure. More...


Chronic inflammation may increase prostate cancer risk, study finds
Chronic inflammation – the body’s natural response to foreign substances in the body – may increase the risk of prostate cancer, Counsel & Heal reported. More...


Free samples of prescription drugs are costly to patients, study says
Even when doctors think they’re doing patients a favor by handing out the freebies, the real beneficiaries are the drug manufacturers, according to new research in the journal JAMA Dermatology. More...


12 million Americans misdiagnosed each year
Each year in the U.S., approximately 12 million adults who seek outpatient medical care are misdiagnosed, according to a new study published in the journal BMJ Quality & Safety. More...


Increases in women's BMI linked to fetal, infant deaths, study says
As a woman’s body mass index rises before she is pregnant or early in pregnancy, there is an increased risk of fetal death, stillbirth or infant death, and severely obese women have the highest risk, researchers said Tuesday. More...


Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy Increases Autism Risk
Women who take antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy may be at an increased risk of having a child with autism spectrum disorder, according to a recent study. More...


Casual marijuana use linked to brain changes
A new study links casual marijuana use with significant changes to parts of the brain. More...


Researchers launch new app for overcoming jet lag
Based on research from mathematicians at the University of Michigan, Entrain is designed for travellers, night-shift workers and anyone else whose circadian rhythms have been thrown out of whack. The app is available now on iOS. More...


Interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C cu'red' 90% of patients
A new study found that an interferon-free combination of drugs was safe, well tolerated and cured over 90% of 380 trial patients with liver cirrhosis in 12 weeks. More...


Caffeine May Fight Alzheimer’s Disease: Study
German and French researchers, in a collaborative study, found that caffeine positively impacts tau deposits in Alzheimer's disease. Tau deposits are an important characteristic features of the disease just like beta-amyloid plaques. More...


Scientists grow noses, ears and other body parts in laboratory
In a British hospital, scientists are growing noses, ears and blood vessels in the laboratory in a bold attempt to make body parts using stem cells. More...


Electric stimulation offers new hope for reawakening paralyzed limbs
With the help of electrodes placed near the spine, patients who had been paralyzed for more than two years were able to regain some voluntary control over their legs, according to a study released Tuesday. More...


Quick, simple blood test for solid cancers looks feasible
The idea of a general, quick and simple blood test for a diverse range of cancers just came closer to reality with news of a new study published in Nature Medicine. More...


Depression ups heart failure risk by 40%
Researchers have said that moderate to severe depression increases the risk of heart failure by 40 per cent. The findings come from a study of nearly 63 000 Norwegians. More...


Insomnia behind stroke risk
A latest study conducted by two top Taiwanese medical bodies has found that insomnia is one of the major causes behind stroke risk More...


Exposure to Morning Light Can Help You Lose Weight
A new study revealed that exposure to morning sunlight can help one shed extra pounds as it helps in the regulation of the body's circadian rhythm and energy balance. The findings can be applied in different institutions to prevent obesity. More...


Dark chocolate for weight loss and diabetes
Dark chocolate is gaining popularity because of its health effects and potentials in preventing cardiovascular diseases. More...


Medicare to Disclose Payment Data on U.S. Doctors for First Time
Medicare, the U.S. health plan for the elderly and disabled, for the first time will release data on its payments to about 550,000 individual physicians. More...


EPA Failed to Disclose Cancer Risk to People in Studies
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency failed to disclose cancer risks to volunteers used in research studies on harmful pollutants, a government watchdog says. More...


Running too much could shorten your lifespan
A number of studies have suggested that a 'moderate' running regimen-a total of two to three hours per week, according to one expert-appears best for longevity, refuting the typical 'more is better' mantra for physical activity, CBS News reported. More...


Japanese scientist faked heralded stem cell research
On Tuesday morning, Obokata’s research institute, Riken, which is almost entirely funded by the government, announced that the 30-year-old had purposely fabricated the data to produce the findings. More...


Vegetables even better for you than fruit
People who eat seven or more portions of fresh fruits and vegetables each day may reduce their risk of dying from a wide variety of diseases by as much as 42 percent over people who consume less than one portion, according to a new study by British researchers who tracked the eating habits of more than 65,000 people for 12 years. More...


Ebola toll rises in 'unprecedented' outbreak
A total of 122 patients are suspected of contracting Ebola and 78 have died, Doctors Without Borders said. More...


Report links obesity to ovarian cancer
Obesity is a health concern in of itself, but a new report suggests that obesity can increase a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer. More...


Pot-smoking style linked to addiction risk
Marijuana smokers' behavior is more important than the potency of their pot or how much of the psychoactive ingredient THC they take in for predicting who will become dependent, according to a small new study. More...


Diet drinks raise heart concern in postmenopausal women
Diet drinks may increase the risk of heart attacks, stroke and other heart problems in postmenopausal women, according to an informal study that could take some fizz out of enjoyment of the popular beverages. More...


Marriage linked to lower heart risks: US study
People who are married have lower rates of several cardiovascular diseases compared with those who are single, divorced or widowed, said a research paper to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. More...


Mediterranean diet may reduce diabetes: Study
A new study suggests that adhering to a Mediterranean diet may reduce the risk of developing diabetes, especially people who are at a high risk for cardiovascular disease. More...


Autism rates now 1 in 68 U.S. children: CDC
One in 68 U.S. children has an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a 30% increase from 1 in 88 two years ago, according to a new report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More...


Occasional Drug Users suffer Changes in Brain
Researchers have discovered that occasional use of drugs like cocaine, amphetamines and prescription drugs such as Adderall, causes changes in the brain of users. More...


Low back pain is number 1 cause of disability worldwide
Many of us experience low back pain at some point in our lives for different reasons. And now, new research suggests this condition causes more disability worldwide than any other ailment. More...


Air pollution kills millions annually, says WHO
Air pollution is responsible for one in eight deaths worldwide, says the WHO, and is now regarded as the biggest environmental health risk. More...


New study finds stress linked to delayed fertility in some women
A new study, published Monday in the journal Human Reproduction, adds to mounting evidence that high levels of alpha-amylase could play a role some women's chances of conceiving. More...


Medical marijuana may alleviate some symptoms of multiple sclerosis
Some forms of medical marijuana may help alleviate certain symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to new guidelines published in the journal Neurology. More...


Pfizer lung cancer drug beats chemo for previously untreated patients
Pfizer Inc's Xalkori delayed progression of lung cancer longer than chemotherapy in patients who had never previously been treated for the disease, according to results of a late-stage study released on Tuesday. More...


Expanded Mich. Medicaid could become model program
Michigan’s expanded Medicaid program — a unique version of the longtime federal health plan for poor people — asks beneficiaries to chip in on their medical costs. More...


Study fuels debate on linking dietary fats to heart disease
Decades after Americans began switching from whole milk to skim, from butter to olive oil, and from red meat to turkey breast - all in an effort to cut saturated fat - nutrition researchers have concluded that saturated fat might not be so bad for our hearts after all. More...


Human nose can detect at least 1 trillion odors says latest study
The study involved gauging the ability of human nose to detect different odors and the results showed that the human nose is far more sensitive than what it is normally credited for. More...


High intake of salt in obese teens causes cells to age faster: Study
In a new study presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology & Prevention/Nutrition, Physical Activity & Metabolism Scientific Sessions 2014, researchers found that overweight teenagers who consume too much salt exhibit signs of faster cell aging. More...


Adult Dishonesty makes Children Cheat and Lie: Study
Kids who are lied to by adults are more likely to cheat and lie. This is what a recent study has found, with experts believing that the children in the study may have simply followed in the footsteps of the lying adults. More...


3D-printed implants restore baby's breathing
Because of a condition that put huge pressure on his airways, 18-month-old Garrett Peterson of Utah had been tethered to ventilators and lived in hospitals since he was born. He was in mortal danger because his airways had collapsed, and even on their highest settings, the ventilators could not prevent his breathing from stopping several times a day. More...


Shift workers beware: Sleep loss may cause brain damage, new research says
Cramming in extra hours of shut-eye may not make up for those lost pulling all-nighters, new research indicates. The damage may already be done -- brain damage, that is, said neuroscientist Sigrid Veasey from the University of Pennsylvania. More...


You're not alone: Medical conspiracies believed by many
About half of American adults believe in at least one medical conspiracy, according to new survey results. More...


Researchers find genetic link between obesity and fried foods
According to the study, people with genes that make them at a higher risk of obesity are twice likely to gain on weight from eating fried food than those with a lower genetic risk. More...


Taking ADHD Drugs as a Child Linked to Later Obesity
New research out of the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health shows that the body mass index of children diagnosed with ADHD and put on medication to treat it can increase months or even years after they've stopped taking their treatment More...


Big study will test chocolate extract pills for heart health
The study will be sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and Mars Inc., maker of M&M's and Snickers bars. The candy company has patented a way to extract flavanols from cocoa in high concentration and put them in capsules. More...


Autism disorders greatly linked with environmental factors, study claims
Now, a new meta-analysis has revealed that toxins in the environment may play a much more significant role in the formation of this neurodevelopmental disorder than previously thought. More...


Five-second rule concerning dropped food has some truth
Researchers in Britain say the urban legend that food picked up seconds after being dropped on the floor has fewer bacteria is, in fact, true. More...


Obesity boosts ovarian cancer risk, study finds
Obesity is probably a factor in some of the almost 22,000 new diagnoses of ovarian cancer that will be handed out this year to American women, a new study says. The finding adds ovarian cancer, the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies, to a growing list of diseases linked to carrying far too much weight. More...


Suffer from migraines? Device worn on the head may prevent them
The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first medical device for preventing migraines. It's called Cefaly and works by stimulating nerves beneath the forehead. More...


Smartphones may threaten parent-child emotional bond
Parents, take note! Your addiction to your smartphone can affect your parenting skills and prevent you from emotionally bonding with the kids, a new study suggests. More...


Report: Cancer will be No. 1 killer in U.S.
In 16 years, cancer will become the leading cause of death in the United States, surpassing heart disease, according to a new report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology. The number of new cancer cases is expected to increase nearly 45% by 2030, from 1.6 million cases to 2.3 million cases annually. More...


Smartphones to diagnose diseases in real time
A team from the US is developing a disease diagnostic system based on nanotechnology that will only require a smartphone and a $20 lens attachment to read results. While there are still some challenges to overcome, they are hopeful the end result will be an affordable diagnostic tool that can be used in the field. More...


New clue may explain link between traffic pollution and heart risks
For the first time, a study suggests that being exposed to high levels of traffic pollution is linked to changes in the mass and size of the right chamber of the heart. The researchers believe this may contribute to the known connection between air pollution exposure and heart disease. More...


Simple blood test can predict Alzheimer's
A simple blood test has the potential to predict whether a healthy person would develop symptoms of dementia within two or three years, a promising research shows. More...


Serious diarrheal infection in kids linked to antibiotics
A new study by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finds that most cases of the severe - and potentially fatal - diarrhea illness in children caused by Clostridium difficile infection picked up outside of the hospital occur among those who have recently taken prescribed antibiotics. More...


Effexor XR Recalled After Accidental Cross Contamination With Heart Drug
Pfizer Inc. announced on Thursday that it is recalling the antidepressant Effexor XR along with other generic versions of the drug because of an accidental oversight of cross contamination with a heart drug. More...


High levels of vitamin D linked to breast cancer survival
Women with breast cancer with high levels of vitamin D in their blood are twice as likely to survive as women with low levels, U.S. researchers say. More...


Lack of Sleep Linked to Obesity in Teens and Increased Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases
A new study reveals that lack of sleep could be linked with obesity in teens--and an increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. More...


Deaths from Alzheimer’s underreported, study says
New research published in Neurology suggests that Alzheimer’s disease may actually be responsible for as many deaths each year as heart disease or cancer – the two leading causes of death in the U.S. More...


LA moves to ban e-cigarettes, joining growing list of cities
The Los Angeles City Council voted on Tuesday to ban the use of electronic cigarettes, also known as 'vaping,' from restaurants, bars, nightclubs and other public spaces in the nation's second-largest city. More...


Yoga May Help Breast Cancer Patients During Radiation Therapy
Women with breast cancer who practiced yoga had lower levels of stress hormones and reported less fatigue and better quality of life, new research shows. More...


Moving out of poverty linked to kids' mental health
Researchers found boys had higher rates of mental health problems years after their families got vouchers to move out of impoverished neighborhoods, compared to boys who didn't get assistance. More...


Too much protein linked to early death
Those who ate a diet high in animal proteins during middle age were four times more likely to die of cancer than contemporaries with low-protein diets - a risk factor comparable to smoking More...


Antibiotic misuse putting hospital patients at risk, CDC says
According to a CDC “Vital Signs” report released this afternoon, poor antibiotic prescribing practices put hospital patients at increased risk for drug-resistant infections, as well as Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), a potentially deadly form of diarrhea. More...


Angry people 'risking heart attacks'
Having a hot temper may increase your risk of having a heart attack or stroke, according to researchers. More...


Study: Rates of many mental disorders much higher in soldiers than in civilians
The largest study of mental-health risk ever conducted among the U.S. military has found that many soldiers suffer from some form of mental illness, and rates of many of these disorders are much higher in soldiers than in civilians. More...


BPA Levels Higher in Men With Prostate Cancer: Study
Now, for the first time, scientists are adding prostate cancer to the list of possible health problems from exposure to BPA. More...


Noise machines for babies too loud
Some noise machines have the ability to produce sounds so loud that they exceed safe levels for adults, let alone infants, and therefore could potentially damage infants' hearing and hinder auditory development. More...


Fighting Cancer with Light-Activated Drug Delivery by Nanoparticle
A new type of treatment called 'light-activated drug delivery' is showing promise as a way to give doctors control over precisely where and when drugs are delivered inside the patient's body. More...


Black Children Twice As Likely To Develop Food Allergies
Research published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology says that food allergy has nearly doubled over the past 23 years in black children. More...


Women’s Health Harmed as Medical Studies Ignore Gender
Scientists continue to neglect gender in medical research, endangering women’s health by focusing on males in studies that shape the treatment of disease, a report found. More...


Insomniacs may have more ‘excitable’ brains compared to good sleepers
People who suffer from insomnia may have more active brains compared to people who sleep soundly, Medical Daily reported. More...


Medics' stethoscopes 'dirtier than hands'
A new study has found that your doctor's stethoscope may be more contaminated than parts of their hands. More...


Boys real victims of autism, says study
Researchers concluded about seven males with mild autism exist for every female. The gender gap was, however, smaller for more severe cases, they highlighted. More...


BPA Implicated In Primate Organ Development
Researchers at the University of Missouri are now saying that daily exposure to very low concentrations of BPA by pregnant females can cause fetal abnormalities in primates. More...


C-section babies have higher odds of being overweight adults
Researchers from Imperial College London in the UK have found that babies born by Caesarean section are more likely to be overweight or obese in adulthood than those born by vaginal delivery. Publishing their results in the journal PLOS ONE, the team says mothers should be aware of these potential long-term consequences for their children. More...


Higher risk of suicide and autism in children born to older dads
A new study from researchers at Indiana University in Bloomington, published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, suggests that the children of older fathers may be more at risk of developing psychiatric problems than children born to younger fathers. More...


New pain pill's Zohydro approval: 'Genuinely frightening'
A coalition of more than 40 health care, consumer and addiction treatment groups is urging the Food and Drug Administration to revoke approval of the prescription drug Zohydro. More...


Obesity rates drop for 2- to 5-year-olds
Obesity rates in children 2 to 5 years old have decreased 43% according to the study published in the journal of the American Medical Association. More...


You’re Absorbing BPA From Your Receipts, Study Shows
A study published Tuesday in the journal JAMA found that people who continuously handle store receipts wind up with significantly elevated levels of bisphenol-A, more commonly known as BPA, in their urine. More...


Acetaminophen During Pregnancy Tied to ADHD
Taking the over-the-counter pain reliever acetaminophen — the active ingredient in Tylenol — during pregnancy may increase a child’s risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD, a new Danish study found. More...


Vegetarian diet may reduce blood pressure
Vegetarians appear to have lower blood pressure which can reduce the risk of heart disease, according to an analysis of previous studies. More...


Thyroid cancer cases soar; is it overdiagnosed?
A dramatic rise in thyroid cancer has resulted from overdiagnosis and treatment of tumors too small to ever cause harm, according to a study that found cases nearly tripled since 1975. More...


Cancer breakthrough: Promising treatment uses patient's own immune system to attack diseased cells
Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York have successfully used the body's own immune system to attack cancer cells. It effectively eliminated the cancer cells in most patients. More...


Most people say rating sites 'important' when picking doctors
When picking a new doctor, most people factor the reviews left on rating websites into their decision, according to a new study. More...


Brain Learns Performing Better Task After Watching Activity Videos: Study
In a new study researchers have found watching of videos of simple task ahead of executing those may help in improving the skills in performing it. It is said our brain is boosted up with the video and adapts task. More...


IVF Baby Boom: Births From Fertility Procedures Hit New High
In 2012, more than 61,000 babies were conceived with the help of IVF, the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology reported Monday. More...


U.S. banned India drugs because of quality concerns
Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd. (RBXY) and Wockhardt Ltd. (WPL) have already been banned from selling drugs in the U.S., Bloomberg reported. More...


5 chemicals harmful to children's brains
Lead, methylmercury, arsenic, polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, and toluene impact brain development and can cause a number of neurodevelopmental disabilities including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, dyslexia and other cognitive damage. More...


Exposure to common infections linked to brain function decline
Exposure to common infections - even if they do not make you ill - may be linked to decline in brain functions like memory and reasoning, according to new research presented at a conference recently. However, the researchers caution more work needs to be done to confirm their findings. More...


Boehringer facing more than 2,000 U.S. lawsuits over blood thinner
German drugmaker Boehringer Ingelheim said on Thursday it is facing more than 2,000 lawsuits in the United States over claims its blockbuster drug Pradaxa, the first in a new class of stroke prevention pills, caused severe and fatal bleeding. More...


Prescription Painkillers Seen as a Gateway to Heroin
Prescription painkillers can act as an introduction - or a reintroduction - to an opiate high. The pills set off heroin craving in recovering addicts, doctors say, every bit as well as they soothe withdrawal in current users More...


New Glasses Help Surgeons 'See' Cancer
Cancer cells glow blue. At least, they do when viewed through new eyewear developed at the WashingtonUniversity School of Medicine in St. Louis, according to a release announcing the new technology. More...


Yogurt slashes Type 2 diabetes risk
Eating yogurt at least four times a week can decrease the risk of developing diabetes by as much as 28 percent, according to a new study. More...


Autism Costs Average $17,000 Yearly for Each Child, Study Finds
The cost of services for children with autism averages more than $17,000 per child each year -- with school systems footing much of the bill, a new U.S. study estimates. More...


Scientists create computer chips that can 'listen' to bacteria
A team of New York-based researchers at Columbia University and Columbia Engineering have utilized computer-type circuitry to study bacteria. More...


How Caffeinated Are Our Kids? Coffee Consumption Jumps
When it comes to caffeine intake, teenagers seem to be getting far more caffeine from coffee drinks. More...


Intravenous Vitamin C May Boost Chemo's Cancer-Fighting Power
Large doses of intravenous vitamin C have the potential to boost chemotherapy's ability to kill cancer cells, according to new laboratory research involving human cells and mice. More...


Subway Removing Azodicarbonamide From Bread After Protest
Subway said today it is removing a chemical used in yoga mats and shoe soles from the bread of it its popular sandwiches after a food blogger got more than 50,000 signatures in a petition drive. More...


Yogurt May Be an Ally in Fight Against Diabetes: Study
Eating yogurt can reduce the risk of getting Type 2 diabetes by 28 percent, compared with consuming none, according to a study published today by Diabetologia. More...


Mediterranean diet linked to lowered risk of heart disease for young populations
Eating a Mediterranean diet can lower your risk of cardiovascular disease, reported the Harvard School of Public Health. More...


How your memory rewrites the past
Your memory is a wily time traveler, plucking fragments of the present and inserting them into the past, reports a new Northwestern Medicine® study. In terms of accuracy, it's no video camera. More...


Fatal Car Accidents Involving Marijuana Triple Over 10 Years
The report, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found that the incidence of car crash victims with pot in their systems jumped from 4.2 percent in 1999 to 12.2 percent in 2010. More...


Added sugars in diet linked to heart disease deaths
Consuming too much sugar can increase the risk of premature death from heart disease, a finding that is fuelling calls for the Canadian and U.S. governments to offer dietary limits on sugar. More...


Cancer cases growing at an alarming pace: WHO
According to IARC, in 2012, the worldwide burden of cancer rose to an estimated 14 million per year. More...


Abortion rate in US reportedly at lowest since 1973
The U.S. abortion rate declined to 16.9 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15-44 in 2011. 21% of all pregnancies (excluding miscarriages) end in abortion. More...


Too much salt ups obesity risk
Adolescents consuming more than twice the recommended daily allowance of salt increases their high sodium intake that correlates with fatness and inflammation regardless of how many calories they consume, a new study has found. More...


Metabolic syndrome linked to poor breakfast habits in childhood
Researchers in Sweden report a link between incidence of metabolic syndrome in adults and the kind of breakfasts those adults ate as children. More...


Peanut allergy treatment can help some kids, study finds
An experimental therapy that fed children with peanut allergies small amounts of peanut flour has helped more than 80 per cent of them safely eat a handful of the previously worrisome nuts. More...


Short people are most prone to feelings of inferiority, study finds
People who experience social situations from a lower height - in other words, short people - are more prone to feelings of paranoia, inferiority and excessive mistrust, according to new research. More...


Testosterone Therapy Linked with Twofold Increase of Heart Attack Risk in Older Men
Testosterone therapy doubles heart attack risk in men under 65 years of age, according to a latest study. More...


Scientists hail breakthrough in embryonic-like stem cells
In experiments that could open a new era in stem cell biology, scientists have found a simple way to reprogram mature animal cells back into an embryonic-like state that allows them to generate many types of tissue. More...


Multiple sclerosis food bug link
A food poisoning bacterium may be implicated in MS, say US researchers. More...


Chemicals In Your Breath Could Reveal Lung Cancer, New Research Says
A simple breath test for lung cancer got a step closer to reality today with research showing that specific compounds in the breath can indicate the presence or absence of lung cancer. More...


Yoga May Reduce Fatigue, Inflammation in Breast Cancer Survivors
Yoga may help breast cancer survivors beat the debilitating fatigue and sleep problems that often follow toxic treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation, a new study shows. More...


Study hints at dramatic link between pesticide DDT and Alzheimer's
In a small but intriguing study, researchers found that, on average, people with Alzheimer's disease had more of the DDT metabolite DDE in their blood serum than a control group in a similar age range. More...


FDA Findings Suggest Approved Feed Additives Not Safe
The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) obtained previously undisclosed review documents from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) revealing antibiotic feed additives approved by FDA for 'nontherapuetic use' - for growth promotion or to prevent disease in livestock and poultry - would likely not be approved under current guidelines. More...


Mortality rates in hospitals are higher over night and on weekends
Heart attack victims are more likely to die from their heart attack if they are taken to the emergency room over night or on the weekend, according to a new study. More...


Pancreatic Cancer Could Be Detected With Blood Test That Pinpoints 'Novel Biomarkers'
Researchers may be a step closer to identifying pancreatic cancer through a blood test. More...


Overweight Americans who pick diet drinks eat more
Heavy Americans who drink diet beverages rather than those sweetened with sugar appear to eat more, according to a study released last week that raised questions about the role low-calorie drinks play in helping people lose weight. More...


Quality Of Evidence Used By FDA To Approve New Drugs Varies Widely
A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association examined 188 new drugs that were approved by the FDA between 2005 and 2012 for 206 indications on the basis of 448 pivotal efficacy trials, but found that one-third of the indications were approved on the basis of just a single trial. More...


Night work 'throws body into chaos'
Shift work has been linked to higher rates of type 2 diabetes, heart attacks and cancer. More...


Researchers Found Link between Positive Attitude and Physical Well-Being
A new research has come up with findings that aged people tend to have better physical function in daily activities if they have enjoyed higher levels of well-being in their adult age in comparison to their counterparts. More...


Soccer-related concussions are common among middle school girls
Soccer-related concussions are common among middle school girls and most continue to play with symptoms. More...


Tiny Bio-bots Reach Micro-Organism World
These bots swim like sperms and are capable of passing through thick biological fluid on their own. More...


Vitamin D Supplements Can Reduce Fibromyalgia Pain
Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) typically have widespread chronic pain and fatigue. For those with low vitamin D levels, vitamin D supplements can reduce pain and may be a cost-effective alternative or adjunct to other treatment, said researchers in the current issue of PAIN. More...


Chocolate, wine and berries may protect against type 2 diabetes
Good news for chocolate and wine lovers. New research suggests that consuming high levels of flavonoids, found in foods such as chocolate, tea, berries and wine, may help protect against type 2 diabetes. This is according to a study recently published in The Journal of Nutrition. More...


Vitamin supplements make sense for some, experts say
Pregnant women, vegans and breast-fed babies are among groups for which supplements are commonly recommended. More...


Americans' Eating Habits Improving, USDA Report Finds
According to the report, between 2005-2010, 42 percent of working-age adults and 57 percent of older adults used nutrition information most or all of the time when making food decisions. Furthermore, 76 percent of working-age adults said they would use nutrition information in restaurants if offered. More...


Quality of U.S. Emergency Room Care Falls, Physicians Say
With Obamacare bearing down on them, a doctors’ group said emergency rooms are less able to provide quality care, and more resources will be needed to handle an expected surge of patients from the new law. More...


Gene therapy 'could be used to treat blindness'
Surgeons in Oxford have used a gene therapy technique to improve the vision of six patients who would otherwise have gone blind. More...


Heavy drinking in middle age may speed men's mental decline
Research led by University College London in the UK suggests men who drink heavily in middle age experience a faster rate of mental decline, compared with men who consume light to moderate amounts of alcohol. More...


Baby Birth Costs Vary 10-Fold in Hospitals, Study Finds
Charges for a non-complicated vaginal delivery in the most populated U.S. state ranged from $3,296 to $37,277, and $8,312 to $70,908 for a non-complicated cesarean section, according to researchers at the University of California at San Francisco. More...


New DNA supercomputer can deliver genome sequencing for just $1k
Researchers have developed a new DNA supercomputer which is promising to deliver radically cheaper genome sequencing. More...


Rotavirus vaccines linked to small risk of intussusception: studies
The second generation vaccines against rotavirus, the most common cause of severe childhood diarrhea worldwide, are associated with a small increased risk of a rare intestinal disorder called intussusception that may require surgery, two U.S. studies suggested Tuesday. More...


Caffeine can help jolt your memory
A new study in the journal Nature Neuroscience suggests that the same amount of caffeine you'd find in a grande latte can enhance long-term memory in humans. More...


Young People Able To Recall Things Better Because They Store Memories in 'High Definition'
Vanderbilt University researchers concluded that older people tend to store their memories in a lower resolution than younger people, which leads to impaired recollection. More...


FDA: Acetaminophen doses over 325 mg might lead to liver damage
'Acetaminophen overdose is one of the most common poisonings worldwide,' according to the National Institutes of Health. More...


Maryland Will Limit Hospital Charges Statewide
Maryland just became the biggest petri dish in America’s experiment to contain health-care costs. The state will limit how much money hospitals take in. More...


Simple blood test may predict patients at risk of heart attack
Developed by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute in California, the new “fluid biopsy” technique can help identify patients who are at very high risk of a heart attack by finding a specific biomarker in the bloodstream. More...


Over-the-counter laxatives can be deadly, FDA warns
OTC laxatives are potentially dangerous if consumers don’t follow dosing instructions or warnings. The FDA said it has received reports of 13 deaths related to laxative use, in addition to reports of serious side effects. More...


Bacteria 'could be a cause of preterm births'
New research from the US has found a link between preterm births where the water sac around the baby breaks prematurely, and bacteria near where the walls of the sac are thinner. More...


New Diabetes Drug Approved by FDA
A new pill to treat adults with type 2 diabetes has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. More...


Report finds billions wasted on health care
Between 21 and 39 percent of medical expenditures in the state of Massachusetts may be wasteful, according to the state’s newly formed Health Policy Commission. That added up to $14.7 billion to $26.9 billion in 2012. More...


Suggested ban on raw milk cheeses overlooks that properly aged cheese is safe
Dairy only accounted for 20% of the food borne illnesses in the US. This number includes eggs. On the other hand 46% of food borne illnesses were caused by produce. More...


Novartis sued by U.S. states over alleged kickbacks to pharmacy firm
U.S. states have sued Novartis over accusations the Swiss drugmaker paid kickbacks to a New York pharmacy company to promote its Exjade drug to treat excessive iron in the blood, the New York Attorney General said. More...


New 'sticky balls' treatment may help stop spread of cancer
Scientists at Cornell University have developed nanoparticles which have the power to demolish tumor cells present in the blood stream thereby further preventing spread of cancer. More...


Teenage Fitness May Reduce Heart Attack Risk Later In Life
Teenage men who are physically fit are less likely to develop heart-related illnesses later in life, according to a new study MedPage Today reported. More...


CDC warns doctors to look out for 38 million heavy drinking Americans
The CDC estimates heavy drinking costs the American economy about $224 billion when taking into account health care costs, property damage and lost work productivity. More...


Has secret of nut allergy prevention been cracked?
Soon-to-be moms may be able to lower their child's risk of developing allergies to peanuts or tree nuts by simply eating more nuts during pregnancy, or within a year before or after giving birth, according to new research. More...


Mediterranean diet's anti-diabetes benefits revealed
Without cutting back on calories, adopting a Mediterranean diet rich in extra-virgin olive oil may protect people at high risk for heart disease against diabetes, a new study found. More...


For Depression Treatment, Meditation Might Rival Medication
A new study out yesterday in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine, finds that mindfulness meditation may rival antidepressants in easing the symptoms of depression. More...


Higher Vitamin D Levels During Pregnancy Linked To Stronger Babies
A new study found that babies can be born with stronger muscles if their mothers have higher levels of vitamin D while pregnant, according to University of Southampton researchers. More...


Medicaid Expansion Drives Up Visits to ER
Study Finding Increased Use Contradicts View of Health-Overhaul Backers More...


Obesity rates tripled in developing countries – survey
The number of obese people in the developing world has reached over 900 million, superseding rates in the developed world, a study has revealed. More...


Could chronic pain be treated with a poppy plant used in ancient Chinese medicine?
Corydalis plant roots contain the painkiller dehydrocorybulbine, which is not thought to lose effectiveness over time, as opiate drugs do. More...


General Mills: Original Cheerios are GMO free
General Mills said that it has changed the sourcing of ingredients for its original Cheerios cereal, after an activist group said that the company bowed to pressure and stopped using genetically modified ingredients. More...


Good night's sleep may be critical for brain health: Swedish study
Swedish scientists say they had found further evidence that sleep helps to promote the health of brain cells. More...



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