DEA Lookup.com Healthcare Industry News: 2016



Study finds pregnancy changes parts of woman's brain
Pregnancy affects not only a woman's body. It changes parts of her brain, too, a new study says. More...


Female physicians product sightly higher survivabiity
The study suggests male doctors would improve if they more closely follow treatment guidelines, provide preventive care more often and communicate more with patients. More...


Medicare Penalizes Hospitals In Crackdown On Antibiotic-Resistant Infections
The federal government has cut payments to 769 hospitals with high rates of patient injuries, for the first time counting the spread of antibiotic-resistant germs in assessing penalties. More...


Limit Lead Levels in Lipstick, Other Cosmetics, FDA says
It should be easy to keep lead at safe levels in lipstick and other cosmetics, the Food and Drug Administration says. More...


Scientists Say the Clock of Aging May Be Reversible
Rejuvenated mice have been able to live 30% longer. More...


This is the most unhealthy state in America
United Health Foundation released a list of states, from healthiest to least healthy. More...


Pilots are keeping mental illness a secret to keep their wings
Thousands of commercial pilots worldwide are likely clinically depressed - some even suicidal - but don't seek treatment for fear of being grounded and losing their wings, according to a new study. More...


E-cigarette use falls among teens
E-cigarette use among teens dropped in 2016, reversing an upward trend that had prompted the U.S. Surgeon General to recommend increased regulation and taxation. More...


Zika Virus Damages 6 Percent of Fetuses in U.S. Study
Two new studies add important details to what doctors know about the Zika virus and the damage it does to babies' brains. More...


One in 6 American Adults Say They Have Taken Psychiatric Drugs, Report Says
About one in six American adults reported taking at least one psychiatric drug, usually an antidepressant or an anti-anxiety medication, and most had been doing so for a year or more, according to a new analysis. More...


Rise In Drug-Dependent Newborns Tied To Rural Areas, Study Finds
An increase of drug dependency among newborns is largely being driven by use of opioids among women in rural areas, a new study finds. More...


Teen Drug Use Is Down, Survey Says
Today's teens are less likely to be taking drugs than their predecessors, a survey says. More...


New Evidence: Obamacare Is Not Saving Lives
New data from the CDC shows that U.S. life expectancy dropped in 2015 - a year after the major provisions of Obamacare went into effect More...


Loneliness May Sabotage Breast Cancer Survival
Weak social ties linked to higher risk of recurrence, early death, researchers report More...


Optimism May Propel Women to a Longer Life
Upbeat outlook linked to lower risk of dying from cancer, heart disease and other causes, study says More...


U.S. life expectancy declines for the first time since 1993
For the first time in more than two decades, life expectancy for Americans declined last year - a troubling development linked to a panoply of worsening health problems in the United States. More...


C-section births may give rise to evolutionary changes
C-section births may be contributing to an even bigger gap between the size of newborns and their mothers’ pelvises. More...


Depression, Suicidal Thoughts Common Among Medical Students
Many medical students from around the world struggle with depression. More...


Study: White Wine May Increase Melanoma Risk
Alcohol intake, specifically white wine, was associated with higher rates of invasive melanoma, according to a new study. More...


Skipping Two Hours Of Sleep May Double Your Crash Risk
Drivers who get 2 hours less sleep double their car accident risk according to a new study. More...


Novartis' drug tops chemotherapy in untreated lung cancer patients
Novartis AG said its cancer drug, Zykadia, was twice as effective as chemotherapy in slowing the progression of a rare form of lung cancer in a late-stage study. More...


Rare Superbug Gene Discovered on U.S. Pig Farm
Researchers have found a rare and frightening superbug gene on a U.S. pig farm and say their discovery suggests raw meat could carry the dangerous germs into the human population. More...


DEA to only send one renewal notice to license holders.
The DEA will also eliminate the 30 day grace period for renewal applications. More...


Eating a Handful of Nuts Every Day Reduces Risk of Heart Disease, Cancer
A new analysis of all current studies regarding the beneficial effects of nut consumption to the body revealed that eating a handful of nut daily could reduce the risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases. More...


Scientists discover link between gut microbes and Parkinson’s disease
Medical researchers in California have made a breakthrough in understanding Parkinson’s disease. More...


J&J loses $1B lawsuit over faulty hip replacements, report says
A jury in Texas has ruled against a subsidiary of pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson in a lawsuit by six patients who received its faulty hip replacements, according to reports. More...


National Steak and Poultry recalls nearly 2M pounds of chicken
After initially recalling 17,349 pounds of chicken, Oklahoma-based National Steak and Poultry has expanded its announcement to include an additional 1,976,089 pounds of ready-to-eat chicken that may be undercooked. More...


People Who Do These Exercises Have The Lowest Odds Of Heart Disease And Death
Swimming, racquet sports and aerobics are associated with the best odds of staving off death, and in particular of reducing the risk of dying from heart disease or stroke, scientists said on Tuesday. More...


Diet shows promise in protecting against Alzheimer's
The MIND diet and certain foods that have a neuroprotective effect and actually appear to be effective in slowing cognitive decline. More...


Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption linked to reduced stroke risk
Cheers, preventive health nuts: Drinking in moderation could be a stroke of genius. More...


Skin patch aims to test sweat for health
Researchers are creating a skin patch that can test those droplets while people exercise and beam results to their smartphones, a possible new way to track health and fitness. More...


Study finds high rate of overdiagnosis from mammograms
Better treatment and not earlier detection with screening mammography may be the reason rates of death from breast cancer have declined in recent years, according to controversial results from a large U.S. database study. More...


Patients plagued by high, unexpected bills from emergency room visits
Two Yale economists are calling for states to end a practice that allows some doctors to surprise patients with large medical bills after visits to a hospital emergency room. More...


Popular heartburn medications linked to higher risk of stroke
Proton pump inhibitors like Prilosec, Nexium, and Prevacid increase stroke risk a new study finds. More...


Brain implant helps ALS patient speak
A high-tech implant has enabled a paralyzed woman with late-stage ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) to communicate through brain signaling, researchers say. More...


CRISPR gene-editing tested in a person for the first time
The move by Chinese scientists could spark a biomedical duel between China and the United States. More...


Does marijuana weaken heart muscles?
A study released Sunday by St. Luke's University Hospital suggests that marijuana use can weaken heart muscles More...


Girls and boys are different in one totally shocking way
A new study finds a fundamental difference in the brains of girls and boys when it comes to response to trauma. More...


Calls to crisis and suicide prevention hotlines surge post-election
National network fields increase in calls More...


This Common Processed Food Ingredient Causes Cancer in Mice
A new study shows that emulsifiers, which are added to many processed foods, can cause cancer in animals More...


Opioid epidemic continues to worsen
Report shows number of overdose deaths increasing over last year More...


Fatal Fungus Linked to 4 New Deaths
Get the facts about a lethal yeast that isn't responding to known drugs and is causing hospital outbreaks around the globe. More...


21 Kids Sickened, Rushed To Hospital From Lauderhill Preschool
Florida health officials are investigating an incident in which more than two dozen kids got sick at a Lauderhill preschool. More...


Jury awards more than $70M to woman in J&J baby powder cancer lawsuit
A St. Louis jury ruled in favor of a woman who claims years of using Johnson & Johnson's baby powder caused her cancer, and she received over $70 million. More...


Compound in broccoli may slow signs of aging
Evidence suggests eating more broccoli, cabbage and avocado you can ward off the signs of aging. More...


What you post and like on Facebook reveals if you're at risk of depression and schizophrenia
The language people use, the topics they discuss and their facial expressions in photos could help spot early signs of mental illness, experts say More...


FDA Warns of Dangers From Testosterone Supplements
Many American men take them, but heart and psychological issues can occur, agency says More...


Pollution particles damage blood vessels, may lead to heart disease
Tiny pollution particles produced by vehicle engines and industry are known to worsen heart disease and raise the risk of stroke, but a new study suggests they might also be planting the seeds for cardiovascular disease early on. More...


Have more sex, eat garlic and don't sleep too much: the new rules for heart health
New research shows how lifestyle can improve heart health. More...


Two diet drinks a day could double the risk of diabetes, study finds
Two fizzy drinks a day could double the risk of diabetes - even if they are diet versions - a Swedish study has found. More...


3 sex-spread diseases hit another record high, CDC says
Infections from three sexually spread diseases have hit another record high. More...


Common household chemicals hurt our health... and cost us billions
Routine contact with plastic bottles, toys, food cans, cosmetics and flame retardants containing 'endocrine-disrupting chemicals' results in ingestion, leading to a toxic buildup and potentially a variety of medical conditions. More...


Could gut bacteria be triggers for migraines?
New research found that people with migraines have a higher level of a bacteria that is used to processed nitrates More...


More than half of mentally ill U.S. adults get no treatment
Twenty percent of adults (43.7 million people) have a mental health condition More...


Girl calls 911 after four women overdose in home
A 12-year-old girl called 911 from a Massachusetts home Sunday after she found four women in the house were unresponsive. More...


Pennsylvania mom malnourished baby with vegan diet
A Pennsylvania woman has been charged with endangering her 11-month-old son by restricting him to a vegan diet of fruits and nuts. More...


Beware extremes: Exercise, anger may trigger heart attack
If you're angry or upset, you might want to simmer down before heading out for an intense run or gym workout. More...


Tax on sugary foods and drinks backed by World Health Organisation
The World Health Organisation (WHO) has added its support to countries which place a 'sugar tax' on soft drinks. More...


Only one in five millennials has tried a Big Mac
McDonald's target audience of young, fast-food gorging consumers, isn't loving America's most famous fast food. More...


Kraft Heinz and Nestle USA recall products due to undeclared allergens and possible Listeria
Kraft Heinz and Nestle USA have recalled two separate products due to possible health concerns: Kraft Heinz 'Lunchables' and Nestle USA 'Drumstick Club.' More...


Birth Control Study Has People Talking About Depression
A Danish study linking birth control with depression has generated excited headlines around the world and struck a chord among many women. More...


Polio-Like Illness Paralyzing Children
The CDC reported a spike in a mysterious polio-like illness, confirmed this year in nearly half of the states in the country. More...


Certain Parents More Likely to Skip Kids' Flu Shot
41% of parents and children are choosing not to get flu shots, many dismissing them as ineffective. More...


Internal clock makes some people age faster and die younger - regardless of lifestyle
Study could explain why even with healthy lifestyles some people die younger than others, and raises future possibility of extending the human lifespan More...


Swedish Scientists Are Able To Edit Healthy Human Embryos
Researchers from the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, injected human embryos with a gene that is able to edit. Their purpose is to make changes of DNA. More...


Cities are taking another look at LED lighting after AMA warning
The American Medical Association issued a warning in June that high-intensity LED streetlights emit unseen blue light that can disturb sleep rhythms and possibly increase the risk of serious health conditions, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. More...


Body fat link to bacteria in feces
The make-up of the bacteria found in human faeces may influence levels of dangerous fat in our bodies, say researchers from King's College London. More...


Health System Ill-Prepared To Deal Rising Obese Population
One in three Americans is obese, but the health care system is ill prepared to treat the rising population More...


Flavorings Boost Toxicity of E-Cigarettes in Lab Study
Increasing device's voltage, to get bigger hit of nicotine, also inflames air passage cells, researcher says More...


Untreatable gonorrhea threat is increasing, new data show
US health officials have identified a cluster of gonorrhea infections that show sharply increased resistance to the last effective treatment available for the country's second most commonly reported infectious disease. More...


Wells Pharmacy Network recalls hundreds of products
A major recall has been issued for 616 products sterile products recently produced by the compounding pharmacy Wells Pharmacy Network. More...


Pediatric Health: Codeine Use Could Have Life-Threatening Complications in Children
A new study revealed that the use of codeine, which has been prescribed to pediatric patients as an analgesic and antitussive agent, could potentially result to life-threatening respiratory complications in children. More...


Blue Bell Voluntarily Recalls Select Ice Cream Products Over Listeria Concerns
Blue Bell Ice Cream said it is voluntarily recalling select ice cream products over concerns they could be contaminated with Listeria bacteria. More...


You're 10 Times More Likely To Develop Schizophrenia If You Have Sibling With The Disease
About one percent of the adult population in the U.S. suffers from schizophrenia, according to the National Institute of Mental Health, but the mental disorder is extremely chronic, severe, and disabling. More...


Stress can erase the benefits of your healthful diet
New research shows that when eating a healthier meal the next morning, the health effects are overshadowed by the carry-over of yesterday's stresses. More...


MIT scientists use radio waves to sense human emotions
There’s a new trick to understanding someone’s poker face - radio waves. More...


New report finds 'Erin Brockovich' chemical in US drinking water
Dangerous levels of chromium-6 are contaminating tap water consumed by hundreds of millions of Americans, according to a national report released Tuesday. More...


Feeding babies peanuts and eggs can reduce risk of developing allergies in later life, study shows
Children as young as four months may benefit from eating foods with high rates of allergy More...


Smoking Permanently Damages Your DNA, Study Finds
Smoking scars DNA in clear patterns, researchers reported Tuesday. Most of the damage fades over time, they found - but not all of it. More...


High-fat cheese: the secret to a healthy life?
A diet rich in cheese might actually be good for our health, according to a new study. More...


Internet Addiction May Lead To More Mental Health Problems, Study Finds
A survey found that people who use the internet more can also have more mental health problems. More...


New study finds that medical marijuana may be helping to curb the opioid epidemic
After states pass laws permitting medical marijuana, drivers in those states become less likely to test positive for opioids after fatal car accidents, a new study from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health has found. More...


FDA approves Bayer contraceptive device Kyleena
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Bayer AG's hormonal contraceptive device, Kyleena, to prevent pregnancy for up to five years, the German company said on Monday. More...


The top 1% may benefit from a genetic advantage at birth
There are genetic variants associated with top grades, better university attendance, and higher incomes More...


Landmark Study Shows Half of Cancer Patients are Killed by Chemo - NOT Cancer
A new study shows up to 50 percent of patients are killed by the drugs - not the disease, itself. More...


Cancer overtakes heart disease as Australia's biggest killer
Cancer has become Australia's biggest killer, overtaking heart disease for the first time to take more lives than any other ailment, a government health agency said in a report released on Tuesday. More...


New Electrical Stimulation Therapy Shows Promise Improving Hand Function In Stroke Patients
Researchers from the MetroHealth System find new electrical stimulation therapy more effective. More...


LEPROSY HITS CALIFORNIA Primary school kids struck down with Biblical flesh-rotting skin disease
Parents have refused to send their children to Indian Hills Elementary after receiving a letter warning of two possible cases More...


Exercise can reduce medical costs
Getting recommended levels of exercise weekly may help keep down annual medical costs both for people with and without cardiovascular disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association. More...


Irregular heartbeat may be tied to more than just stroke risk
Atrial fibrillation, a type of irregular heartbeat that's already linked to an increased risk of stroke, may also be tied to higher risk of heart attack, heart failure, kidney disease and sudden death, according to a new research review. More...


Allergies In Children: Early Antibiotics Exposure Ups Risk Of Allergies Later In Life
Use of antibiotics in children within the first two years of life increases the risk of eczema and hay fever later in life, reports a recent study. More...


Parents' Mental Health Tied to Suicide, Violence in Kids
Children whose parents have certain psychiatric illnesses are at increased risk of attempting suicide and committing violent offenses, researchers found. More...


C-section babies 'more likely' to grow up obese
'Babies born by caesarean more likely to be obese as adults, study suggests,' The Guardian reports. More...


Pollution particles in the brain linked to Alzheimer's disease
'Air pollution particles linked to Alzheimer's found in human brain,' Sky News reports after new research found tiny particles of magnetite - a potentially toxic by-product of traffic pollution - in samples of brain tissue. More...


Doctors Wasting Over Two-Thirds Of Their Time Doing Paperwork
A study recently published found that most of a doctor's day is spent on paperwork More...


Aerial Spraying for Zika Stirs Controversy in Miami Beach
Miami Beach city leaders are at odds with a scheduled aerial spraying of the insecticide Naled over a 1.5-square-mile infection zone. More...


Nurses strike over insurance at 5 Minnesota hospitals
Thousands of nurses at five Minnesota hospitals launched a strike on Monday, Labor Day, in a dispute over health insurance, workplace safety and staffing levels. More...


Asher's recalls 40 chocolate items over possible salmonella
This is the first time salmonella has been an issue for Asher's in their 124 years in business. More...


Obamacare rate hikes rattle consumers, could threaten enrollment
Rate increases will be as high as 43%. More...


Gonorrhea antibiotics rendered ineffective by STI's 'high levels of resistance', WHO warns
The sexually transmitted disease could become untreatable with 'serious sexual and reproductive health consequences', World Health Organisation says More...


'Like it's been nuked': Millions of bees dead after South Carolina sprays for Zika mosquitoes
South Carolina spraying for mosquitos in an effort to control the zika virus has killed millions of honeybees. More...


Is new Alzheimer's drug a 'game-changer?'
An experimental drug shattered and removed toxic plaques in the brains of patients with early-stage Alzheimer's disease, researchers said Thursday. More...


Tapping apps and the internet really does rev up heart health
Many people who tap the internet and their mobile devices for help getting healthy have successfully lost weight, quit smoking and started drinking less, according to the American Heart Association. More...


Study finds strong link between Zika and Guillain-Barre
A comparison of rates of Guillain-Barre syndrome before and after Zika arrived in seven countries has found a strong association between the virus and the illness, researchers from the Pan American Health Organization said on Wednesday. More...


Many adults treated for depression in the US may not be depressed, study finds
Many adults with depression do not receive treatment, while most who were treated did not screen positive for depression, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine. More...


Baby simulators not effective in preventing pregnancy, study says
Baby simulator programs, designed to teach teenage girls how difficult it is to take care of a baby and deter them from getting pregnant, may actually backfire. More...


Why Parents Aren't Vaccinating Their Kids, According to New Study
The main reason parents do not vaccinate is they believe they are unnecessary. Other reasons are discomfort to the child having too many shots at one time, safety/adverse effects concerns, concerns about autism, and concerns about thimerosal. More...


Hepatitis A Outbreak Linked to Frozen Strawberries From Egypt
At least 40 people have been sickened in a hepatitis A outbreak that health officials believe is linked to frozen strawberries, according to the Virginia Department of Health. More...


Scientists ‘jump-start’ man’s brain after coma
Scientists have used a sonic technique to excite a man’s neurons, and the technology could one day be used to wake people up from a coma. More...


Burden of Health-Care Costs Moves to the Middle Class
Rising out-of-pocket health care costs ‘means less money for other things’ More...


Study finds most teens vaping fruity flavors, not nicotine
A study found that only a fraction of young vapers were inhaling nicotine. More...


McDonald's recalls 29 million fitness bands that were in Happy Meals
McDonald's announced Aug. 23, 2016, that the company is recalling the fitness bands that it had put in Happy Meals because they might cause skin irritation or blistering on children. More...


American Heart Association urges strict added sugars limit for kids
For the first time, the American Heart Association is urging parents to cut way back on how much added sugar they feed children ages 2-18. More...


Job satisfaction in your 20s and 30s may impact your health later
A new study finds that job satisfaction appears to have the biggest impact on midlife mental health More...


It's Dangerous to Swim or Sleep While Wearing Contact Lenses, CDC Says
People who swim or sleep in contact lenses have an increased risk of contracting corneal infections, CDC says. More...


Close Family Relationships More Important Than Friendship In Extending Seniors' Life Expectancy
For seniors, having closer relationships with relatives and family members may be more important than friendships, particularly when it comes to extending life expectancy. More...


Fatty Fish May Curb Eye Risks for Diabetics, Study Finds
Two servings of fish a week may be enough to lower the heightened risk for blindness that those with diabetes face, a new Spanish study suggests. More...


Gallstones Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk
People who've ever suffered gallstones may have a slightly increased risk of developing heart disease down the road, a large new study suggests. More...


Zika Might Affect Adult Brains, Too, Study Finds
The Zika virus, previously thought only to be a big threat to developing babies, might also affect adult brains, researchers reported Thursday. More...


Cancer overtakes heart disease as the main cause of death in 12 European countries
Although diseases of the heart and blood vessels (cardiovascular disease, CVD) kill more people worldwide than anything else, with 17.3 million deaths globally, cancer has now overtaken CVD as the main cause of death in 12 European countries. More...


Acetaminophen use in pregnancy linked to kids' behavioral problems
Acetaminophen , long the mainstay of a pregnant woman’s pain-relief arsenal, has been linked to behavioral problems in children born to mothers who used it during pregnancy. More...


Combat vets now fighting a new war: Pain pill addiction
Sixty percent of veterans from recent wars are being treated for chronic pain. More...


Researchers find unsafe levels of industrial chemicals in drinking water of 6 million Americans
Drinking water supplies serving more than six million Americans contain unsafe levels of a widely used class of industrial chemicals linked to potentially serious health problems, according to a new study from Harvard University researchers. More...


Hypertension is now more common in poor and middle-income countries than rich ones
Middle- and lower-income countries now have a higher rate of hypertension than high-income countries. More...


Maternal Mortality Rates on the Rise in Most US States
Maternal mortality up over 25% over the last 15 years, mostly due to violence. More...


Researchers say reading may increase lifespan
A new study finds reading books may help us live longer by as many as two years More...


Brains Of Overweight People 10 Years Older Than Lean Counterparts
Being overweight can do more to your head than just damage your self-image, it can literally damage your brain. More...


'Rationing' Acts Reported by More Than Half of Physicians
More than half of the physicians in a national survey engaged in behaviors consistent with rationing, according to a study published online July 19 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. More...


Amish Kids Living On Traditional Farms Less Likely To Develop Asthma, Study Finds
When scientists did a comparative analysis of children belonging to two farming-based religious communities, they found that the community which shunned modern technology had lesser risk of developing asthma than the other. More...


Smog May Shorten Lives of Lung Cancer Patients
Large review in California finds lower survival rates among those with most exposure to dirty air More...


Medical Services For Opioid Dependency Up 3,000 Percent Over Last Decade
A new report shows the rate of medical services for opioid dependency has risen by more than 3,000 percent between 2007 and 2014, while services for opioid abuse have risen by more than 300 percent. More...


Study Links Sleep Problems to Stroke Risk, Recovery
Too little or too much sleep may be a risk factor for stroke and might hinder recovery, new research suggests. More...


The average Americans' weight change since the 1980s is startling
There's no doubt about it: Americans are getting heavier and heavier. More...


Low rate of Internet use by seniors for health purposes
In a study appearing in the August 2 issue of JAMA, David M. Levine, M.D., M.A., of Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, and colleagues examined trends in seniors' use of digital health technology in the U.S. from 2011-2014. More...


Morning Mix 1.7 million-year-old cancer found, the oldest yet
New findings from researchers in South Africa challenge the conventional opinion about cancer is a relatively recent phenomenon. More...


These 4 Natural Sunburn Cures Will Keep You From Feeling The Burn Forever
Natural substances like raw honey, aloe vera, and coconut oil can help your skin feel better after a sunburn. More...


Is Pot Harder on the Heart Than Tobacco?
Smoking pot might harm your heart health and that of the people around you -- perhaps even more than cigarettes, a new animal study suggests. More...


Researchers find biological explanation for non-celiac wheat sensitivity
Individuals who experience sensitivity to wheat in the absence of celiac disease or wheat allergy had compromised intestinal epithelial barrier integrity and resulting systemic immune activation, according to the results of a new study published in Gut. More...


General Mills expands flour recall after new illnesses
General Mills has added more flour production dates to the recall announced on May 31 after four new illnesses were confirmed. More...


More cancer-causing chemicals found in electronic cigarettes
The vapor from electronic cigarettes contains two previously unidentified chemicals that can cause cancer, according to a new study. More...


Many Well-Known Hospitals Fail To Score High In Medicare Rankings
The federal government released its first overall hospital quality rating on Wednesday, slapping average or below average scores on many of the nation's best-known hospitals while awarding top scores to many unheralded ones. More...


Lack of exercise costs world $67.5B and 5M lives a year
A study of one million people has found that physical inactivity costs the global economy $67.5 billion a year in healthcare and productivity losses, but an hour a day of exercise could eliminate most of that. More...


Study shows spike in prostate cancer cases
A new health study shows a 72 percent increase in the number of metastatic, or widespread, prostate cancer cases in the last decade. More...


A New Depression Treatment Shows Promise
A new method known as behavioral activation (BA) is effective and can be cheaper than cognitive behavioral therapy More...


HPV Vaccination Controversy in Japan, Rates Plummet to 1%
Controversy over human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in Japan has led to vaccination rates falling from 70% to only 1%. More...


New Study Links Asthma With Fracking
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have published a study linking unconventional gas development with asthma attacks. More...


Nearly One in Five American Teens Has Prediabetes or Diabetes
Nearly one in five American teenagers has an abnormal glucose level, according to new government data. More...


Study sees rise in advanced prostate cancer cases
The number of new cases of advanced prostate cancer in the United States has soared by about 72 percent in the last decade, according to a new study, but not all experts agree with its findings. More...


No Clear Survival Benefit Seen Among Diabetes Drugs
Eight different diabetes drug classes examined in a meta-analysis failed to demonstrate improved cardiovascular or all-cause mortality compared with placebo. More...


Cartilage Grown in Lab Might One Day Help Younger Arthritis Sufferers
Scientists report progress toward developing lab-grown cartilage that could postpone or possibly eliminate the need for hip replacement surgery in younger arthritis patients. More...


Artificial sweeteners may trick people into being hungrier, study says
While decreasing consumption of sugar can be good for health, replacing it with an artificial sweetener such as sucralose may not be better because it tricks the brain into making animals more hungry, researchers say. More...


Researchers explain why jet lag can be worse when you travel east
Traveling east takes 30% more recovery time More...


Dietary Mineral Magnesium May Help Lower Blood Pressure
Researchers have found a link between intake of magnesium supplement and healthy reduction in blood pressure. More...


Cycling May Help Lower Risk For Type 2 Diabetes: Study
A two-wheel ride instead of four could help lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes among adults, a new study in Denmark revealed. More...


Your Daily Coffee Consumption Could Be Making You Deaf
A recent McGill University study found caffeine may impede your body's ability to recover from what would have been short-term hearing loss More...


Exercise May Improve Stress-Related Memory Problems In Breast Cancer Survivors
Now, a new study has yet again provided another evidence of the benefits of engaging in physical activities and this time involving breast cancer survivors. More...


Allergies Less Common in Kids Who Suck Thumb, Bite Nails
If your kid's nail-biting or thumb-sucking habit drives you nuts, you'll be happy to hear that a new study suggests those habits may have a health benefit. More...


Concussion Rates Have Doubled Among U.S. Kids
Concussion rates are rising sharply among U.S. kids and teens, researchers report. More...


Do U.S. Food Subsidies Make People Fat?
Researchers say they have turned up more evidence that U.S. government policies that subsidize foods such as meat, cheese and corn are helping make Americans fatter and unhealthier. More...


Exercise, for a Healthier Pregnancy
A new study finds that exercise is associated with healthier pregnancy. More...


CDC: FluMist shouldn't be used during upcoming flu season
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory committee suggested that FluMist, the nasal spray influenza vaccine, should not be used in the upcoming flu season. More...


General Mills Expands Recall Over E. Coli Outbreak
General Mills of Minneapolis, MN, is expanding its recall of Gold Medal flour, Wondra flour, and Signature Kitchens flour to include flour made earlier in the fall that may still be in consumers’ pantries. More...


Vagus nerve stimulation may help reduce rheumatoid arthritis symptoms
The treatment method may also be useful for other inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's and Parkinson's. More...


Ibuprofen 'disables' Ebola virus
The painkiller ibuprofen and the cancer drug toremifene can disable the Ebola virus, say researchers. More...


Wild plant with toxic sap that eats away at your skin is spreading
When you venture outside this summer, be on the lookout for Wild Parsnip. The poisonous weed grows in nearly all 50 U.S. states, including Colorado. More...


Zika May Affect Infants Born Without Microcephaly
New findings suggest that infants who were not born with microcephaly could still have developmental issues due to the Zika virus. More...


The top 10 leading causes of death in the U.S.
Heart disease and cancer still top the list as the leading causes of death in the United States, but the gap is closing between the two. More...


Canned Foods Linked To BPA Risk In New Study
A new study published in the journal Environmental Research on Wednesday reveals that consuming canned foods can expose our bodies to BPA and pinpoints the worst offenders. More...


Heroin Overdose Deaths Have Tripled in 5 Years, DEA Says
The Drug Enforcement Administration is out with a new report on heroin use in the United States and the news is grim. More...


Survey finds excess health problems in lesbians, gays, bisexuals
Gay, lesbian and bisexual individuals reported more health problems than straight men and women, in a large U.S. survey. More...


Sudden Heart Death More Common in Male Minority Athletes
A new study finds that in many cases of young athletes dying suddenly, an underlying heart problem was already present. More...


Second U.S. case of 'superbug' gene found in New York patient
A New York patient is now the second U.S. citizen to be infected with bacteria carrying a 'superbug' gene, according to findings published earlier this week in the journal for Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. More...


FDA approves first pill to treat all forms of hepatitis C
Federal health officials on Tuesday approved the first pill to treat all major forms of hepatitis C, the latest in a series of drug approvals that have reshaped treatment of the liver-destroying virus. More...


Study finds contagious cancers can spread among several species of shellfish
A new study suggests direct transmission of cancer among some marine animals may be more common than once thought, as research revealed that contagious cancer cells among several species of bivalves, including mussels and clams, spread from animal to animal through sea water. More...


Doctors issue warning about too-bright LED streetlights
The American Medical Association has just adopted an official policy statement about street lighting: cool it and dim it. More...


Hundreds arrested for $900 million worth of health care fraud
The Justice Department announced Wednesday it's charging hundreds of individuals across the country with committing Medicare fraud worth hundreds of millions of dollars. More...


A Zika Vaccine Is Now Ready for Human Test Subjects
The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has granted clinical trial approval for an experimental Zika vaccine. More...


Having Nuts In Your Diet May Reduce Risks From Prostate Cancer, Study Suggests
A new research from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston claims that men with prostate cancer can significantly reduce their risk of dying from the disease by eating nuts such as cashews, hazelnuts, pistachios and walnuts. More...


Caffeine Boost May Not Help You If You Are Extremely Sleep-Deprived, Study Says
Caffeine won't give you a mental boost if you did not get enough sleep for three nights in a row, a new study suggested. More...


Well-timed exercise might improve learning
Aerobic exercise four hours after a memorization task, but not exercise right afterwards, was linked to improved recall in a series of Dutch experiments. More...


Pinnacle Foods (PF) Recalls Petite Peas Products
Pinnacle Foods, Inc. recalled a limited number of C&W Early Harvest Petite Peas and C&W Petite Peas, after tests showed that these products might contain Listeria monocytogenes. More...


Sleep apnea tied to heart risk even after arteries are cleared
For people who have had a procedure to open blocked heart arteries, untreated sleep-breathing problems like snoring or apnea may raise the risk of a future heart attack or stroke, researchers say. More...


Deaths from the drug that killed Prince are skyrocketing in N.J.
Fentanyl, an opioid up to 50 times more powerful than heroin, is killing New Jersey residents at a skyrocketing rate, representing a deadly new wrinkle to the state's opioid crisis, data obtained by NJ Advance Media shows. More...


UN: Coffee no longer deemed possible carcinogen
The World Health Organization's research arm has downgraded its classification of coffee as a possible carcinogen, declaring there isn't enough proof to show a link to cancer. More...


Too little sleep linked to health problems in children, teens
Updated sleep recommendations for children and teens point to the benefits of getting enough sleep and the dangers of getting too little. More...


Washington says it wants to stop the opioid crisis, but politics get in the way
Democrats and Republicans are working on strategies to fight opioid addition and get more people into treatment and recovery programs. More...


Very hot drinks are 'probably carcinogenic'
Anyone who likes to curl up with a steaming hot drink should consider letting some of that warmth subside; drinking it could increase their risk of developing cancer. More...


Opioids Common After Hospital Discharge; Storage Knowledge Poor
About 15% of a group of Medicare patients who had not used opioid medications in the previous 2 months filled opioid prescriptions within a week of hospital discharge, according to a research report published online June 13 in JAMA Internal Medicine. More...


Migraines Linked To Vitamin D Deficiency In New Study
If you're prone to migraines, you might be deficient in vitamin D, a new study has suggested. More...


The Downside of Merging Doctors and Hospitals
Integrated delivery system hospitals lead to higher prices and more unnecessary hospitalizations. More...


E-Cigarettes a Gateway to Smoking for Teens: Study
Teens in the United States who use electronic cigarettes are six times more likely to move on to traditional cigarettes compared to kids who never use the devices, a new study reports. More...


Heroin deaths in New York outpacing those in rest of nation
A new report from New York State found suggests heroin use in the state is exceeding national averages and that its death rate from opioid abuse is outpacing that of other states. More...


Researchers develop blood test to detect early-stage Alzheimer's
Researchers say they’ve developed a blood test that detects an early stage of Alzheimer’s disease with “unparalleled accuracy.” More...


FDA Takes Action Against Illegal Online Pharmacies
More than 4400 websites that illegally sell potentially dangerous and unapproved drugs were targeted in an operation by the FDA, law enforcement, and international agencies. More...


Some Antidepressants Might Actually Be Harmful to Children and Teens
A discouraging new study concludes that most antidepressants are ineffective for children and adolescents, and may even increase risk of suicide. More...


As obesity rates rise, cities declare war on sugar
A report Tuesday says more than 40 percent of women are obese, which is based on body mass. On the other hand, 35 percent of men are obese. More...


FDA: People are overdosing on anti-diarrhea drugs
Active ingredient in Immodium and similar drugs gives opiate-like high More...


Women more prone to anxiety than men
A new British study that found that women are twice as likely to suffer from anxiety as men More...


Sleep Loss Increases Heart Disease Risk For Shift Workers
New research suggests that insufficient sleep, particularly for shift workers, may increase a person's risk for cardiovascular diseases. More...


Healthy Fats in This Diet Won't Cause Weight Gain
Vegetable oils, nuts can be a part of a healthful diet, experts say More...


FDA: Bleeding Risks From Antacids With Aspirin
Alka Seltzer, Bromo Seltzer among over-the-counter products vulnerable patients should avoid, FDA says More...


Rare cancers linked to cell phones
A study has linked cell phone radiation to rare cancers in rats and mice. More...


For Black Americans, Stroke In Middle Age Is Deadlier Than For Whites
Middle-aged black Americans have higher chances of dying from stroke than their white counterparts not because of discrimination in care, but because of an elevated stroke rate, new research suggests. More...


Report Hints Zika Can Spread Through Oral Sex
French finding adds to growing evidence that sexual transmission of the virus more common than thought. More...


Women With Migraine May Face Higher Threat of Heart Disease, Stroke
Women who suffer from migraine headaches may have a slightly increased risk of heart disease or stroke, a new study suggests. More...


Long-term pot use tied to gum disease
Smoking marijuana for decades may result in gum disease and potential tooth loss, a new study indicates. More...


General Mills flour sickens 4 Michiganders with E. coli
Four Michiganders have been infected with E. coli as a result of General Mills flour and two had to be hospitalized. More...


Opioid Prescriptions Decreasing, But Overdose Deaths Still Climbing
Despite a decline in opioid prescriptions, overdose deaths are still on the rise. More...


First Rise in U.S. Death Rate in Years Surprises Experts
The death rate in the United States rose last year for the first time in a decade, preliminary federal data show, a rare increase that was driven in part by more people dying from drug overdoses, suicide and Alzheimers disease. More...


Ecstasy use jumps in Europe, no longer just a dance drug
The drug ecstasy is making a comeback in Europe, spreading as a mainstream party narcotic away from its niche use at dance clubs and reaching new young users, the Lisbon-based European drug agency said on Tuesday in a report. More...


Lifestyle may be key to improving ADHD in kids
Healthy lifestyle behaviors may be an effective intervention, either alongside or in the place of traditional ADHD medications. More...


Prescription Painkillers May Worsen And Lengthen Chronic Pain
A University of Colorado-Boulder study has found that opioid use increases chronic pain in rats. More...


Breast Cancer Genetic Risk Can Be Mitigated With Lifestyle Fixes, Researchers Say
By adhering to a healthy lifestyle, women who are at increased genetic risk of developing breast cancer can mitigate their chances of developing the disease, according to a Johns Hopkins University-led team of researchers. More...


The superbug that doctors have been dreading just reached the U.S.
For the first time, researchers have found a person in the United States carrying bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort, an alarming development that the top U.S. public health official says could mean the end of the road for antibiotics. More...


Nearly Half Of Antidepressants Prescribed To Treat Pain, Anxiety And Insomnia
In Quebec, Canada, new research has revealed that nearly half of antidepressant prescriptions were not for depression-related conditions, but for disorders such as anxiety, insomnia and panic attacks. More...


Could a Low-Salt Diet Hurt Your Health?
A controversial new study contends that a low-salt diet could be dangerous for your heart health. More...


Papa John's Salad And Produce Recalls Oriental Salad Over Fears Of Listeria Contamination
Papa John's Salad and Produce has issued a recall for its Oriental Salad with Sesame Ginger Dressing after learning it contained sesame seeds that are part of the recent SunOpta sunflower kernal recall expansion. More...


New Jersey Has Higher Rates of Melanoma Than Other States
Rates of melanoma - the deadliest form of skin cancer - are increasing. More...


Painkillers peak? Report finds recent drop in opioid prescriptions
In a sign that the opioid painkiller epidemic might have peaked, new data shows that the number of U.S. prescriptions for the powerful painkillers has dropped for the first time in 20 years. More...


Sweetener Xylitol can kill or poison dogs, FDA warns
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a stronger warning that a common sweetener in chewing gum, mints and other products could kill or severely poison dogs. More...


FDA requires stronger warnings for antibiotics' side effects
The Food and Drug Administration said Thursday it will require heightened warnings about serious and sometimes disabling side effects from the commonly used class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. More...


Surgery restores paralyzed border collie's ability to walk
Paralysis is usually thought to be permanent, but thanks to a surgical team from UC Davis' veterinary hospital, a 4-year-old border collie’s inability to move has been reversed. More...


How your car side window may be harming your skin, eyes
The front windshield of your car probably shields you from the sun's UV-A rays as you drive, but the same may not be true for side windows, a new study finds. More...


Abortion rates fall to historic low in wealthy countries, little changed elsewhere
Abortion rates have dropped dramatically in the past 25 years to historic lows in wealthy countries, but dipped only slightly in poorer developing nations, according to a global study published on Wednesday. More...


This common pain reliever may reduce empathy, study says
52 million people take medicine containing acetaminophen which can blunt emotions including empathy. More...


CDC mishandled bioterror germs
A laboratory operated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had its permit suspended for three years for violating federal safety rules in its handling of bioterror pathogens, according to a report published Tuesday. More...


Fentanyl: The new heroin, but deadlier
Fentanyl is being made illicitly and sold on the streets. More...


Study suggests why common heartburn drugs increase risk for dementia, heart disease
Proton pump inhibitors like Prilosec and Nexium can lead to heart disease and dementia. More...


Second Skin May Reduce Wrinkles, Eyebags, Scientists Say
Scientists at Harvard and M.I.T. have discovered that a thin film of chemical second skin can make wrinkles disappear. More...


Artificially Sweetened Drinks in Pregnancy Tied to Higher Infant BMI
A new study by University of Manitoba found that artificial sweeteners are tied to early signs of childhood obesity. More...


Forehead zapper to ease migraine pain: Tiny implant in forehead sends electric pulses
A pea-sized device that produces weak pulses of electricity is being tested as a treatment for migraine. More...


Listeria fears spur Costco and Trader Joe’s to pull food
Sacramento-area branches of Costco and Trader Joe’s have pulled all products involved in two separate multistate recalls of food that may be contaminated with listeria bacteria. More...


Popular heart drug linked to dementia risk in study
People with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation may have a heightened risk of developing dementia -- and the quality of their drug treatment may play a role, a new study hints. More...


Medical Errors Are No. 3 Cause Of U.S Deaths, Researchers Say
A study by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine says medical errors should rank as the third leading cause of death in the United States. More...


Hepatitis C deaths hit all-time high in United States
Hepatitis C-related deaths reached an all-time high in 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday, surpassing total combined deaths from 60 other infectious diseases including HIV, pneumococcal disease and tuberculosis. More...


FDA Imposes Rules for E-Cigarettes in a Landmark Move
After years of debate about the health risks of electronic cigarettes, the federal government on Thursday made it final: They need to be regulated and kept out of the hands of children. More...


NFL Warns Players Eating Too Much Meat In Mexico, China Could Lead To Failed Drug Test
The NFL is warning players not to eat Chinese and Mexican meat because it could be contaminated with anabolic agent clenbuterol. More...


Want better sleep, better mood and better sex? Cut calories
A new study finds that the secret to getting more sleep, having better sex and improving your mood is calorie restriction. More...


Playground-related brain injuries on the rise
There is an average of 21,000 playground-related traumatic brain injuries annually among kids age 14 and younger. More...


Another Big Verdict in Talc Case Against Johnson & Johnson
Twice in the past three months, juries have awarded tens millions of dollars to ovarian cancer victims who blamed Johnson & Johnson talcum powder for their illness. More...


New Report Finds Teens Feel Addicted to Their Phones, Causing Tension at Home
A new report issued today by Common Sense Media finds that 50 percent of teens 'feel addicted' to mobile devices, and 59 percent of their parents. More...


What Is Interval Training? Everything You Need To Know
If you're looking for an effective way to shed some pounds without having to spend hours of your day in the gym, you might want to try out interval training, an exercise regimen that combines short bursts of high intensity activities with intervals of light activities. More...


Teen pregnancy rates at an all-time low
Birth rates among teens in the U.S. have dropped dramatically since 2006, according to a new report, and there are a lot of factors behind the trend, including a steep decline in births by black and Hispanic teens. More...


Price of Cancer Drugs Has Skyrocketed Since 2000
Researchers say initial prices of new cancer drugs are six times higher More...


FDA warns yeast infection drug may cause miscarriage
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has warned doctors against prescribing an oral yeast infection drug to pregnant women because the medication may increase the risk of miscarriage. More...


Child obesity has grown unabated since 1999, study finds
New research finds rates of obesity have increased steadily from 1999 to 2014, and the numbers of children with the severest forms of obesity have risen most dramatically. More...


Laundry Detergent Pods Cause Increase in Poisonings, Serious Effects
Rates of poisonings from laundry and dishwasher detergent packets or “pods” are steadily increasing, and so are serious injuries from those exposures More...


Canada confirms its first sexually transmitted Zika case
An Ontario resident is Canada's first confirmed case of a Zika virus infection that was contracted locally through sex, health officials said on Monday. More...


Music may help boost babies' learning skills: study
New research suggests that listening to music improves kids cognitive skills and helps them learn language faster. More...


U.S. suicide rates up, especially among women, but down for black males
The number of suicides in the United States has been on the rise since 1999 in everyone between the ages of 10 and 74, according to a new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More...


White Americans Are Dying Younger as Drug and Alcohol Abuse Rises
Life expectancy for white Americans declined in 2014 according to new federal data - a troubling sign that distress among younger and middle-age whites who are dying at ever-higher rates from drug overdoses is lowering average life spans for the white population as a whole. More...


Wearing SPF30 sunscreen has strong ability to prevent deadliest skin cancer, study finds
New research suggests a measurable benefit of slathering on sunblock with as little as SPF30: a reduced risk of melanoma. More...


The Great GMO Cover-Up #2 Companies Hide Dangers; Attack Scientists
Independent studies feature GMO-fed animals suffering from organ damage, tumors, endocrine and immune system dysfunction, and premature death. More...


Insurers warn losses from ObamaCare are unsustainable
Health insurance companies are amplifying their warnings about the financial sustainability of the ObamaCare marketplaces as they seek approval for premium increases next year. More...


Study says jet air hand dryers spread 1,300 times more germs than paper towels
A research study seems to show that jet air hand dryers, which are designed to be more efficient than warm air hand dryers and towels are very germy. More...


Antibiotics In Animal Feed May Be Increasing Drug-Resistant Bacteria Globally
Using antibiotics in animal feed on farms could be causing a global problem. Antibiotic resistance may be spreading due to farming practices. More...


Vegetable fat not the route to a healthy heart: study
Replacing animal fat in the human diet with vegetable oil seems not to lower heart disease risk, and might even boost it, according to a study published Wednesday that challenges a cornerstone of dietary advice. More...


Could Fast Food Expose People to Harmful Chemicals?
Eating fast food may expose a person to potentially harmful chemicals known as phthalates, a new study suggests. More...


Beware! Daily stress can lead to diabetes
Unnecessary stress can trigger elevation in blood sugar levels leading to Type 2 diabetes health experts have warned. More...


Smokers have harder time finding jobs, earn less than non-smokers
A new study by the Stanford University School of Medicine suggests that unemployed smokers take longer to find work than non-smokers - and once smokers do land jobs, they earn less than their smoke-free peers. More...


Federal Reclassification of Marijuana Could Have Major Impact on Medical Uses
Federal authorities have announced that they are reviewing the possibility of loosening the classification of marijuana, and if this happens, it could have a far-reaching impact on how the substance is used in medical settings, experts said. More...


Marriage helps in beating cancer: Study
Being married is a factor in a cancer patient's survival rate a new study has found. More...


Full-Fat Dairy Products May Cut Risk For Obesity And Diabetes, Study Says
Two new studies have confirmed that people who consumed full-fat dairy products weighed less than those who drank slim products. More...


Study: Diabetes, depression share link
Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health conducted a 10-year study that suggests diabetes and depression are linked. More...


2 Diabetes Drugs May Be Linked to Heart Failure Risk
Diabetes drugs containing saxagliptin and alogliptin may raise the risk of heart failure, particularly in patients with heart or kidney disease, U.S. health officials warned Tuesday. More...


Hearts really can 'break' after death of loved one
Losing your nearest and dearest may break your heart, literally. More...


Diabetes cases reach 422 million as poorer countries see steep rises
The number of adults with diabetes has quadrupled worldwide in under four decades to 422 million, and the condition is fast becoming a major problem in poorer countries, a World Health Organization study showed on Wednesday. More...


Vitamin D increases heart’s pumping power
It has been found that heart patients would be better off if they took some vitamin D. More...


Few doctors sign up on to federal registry to treat opioid addiction
In order to prescribe anti-addiction medications doctors must go through far more federal hurdles than are required for any other medications. Meanwhile, mortality rates in the current epidemic of addiction are 400%-500% higher than in the 1970s. More...


Prediabetes: The Silent Health Condition That Affects Thousands
Thousands of Connecticut residents are prediabetic but don't know it and if they did, doctors say, early detection and lifestyle changes could prevent diabetes from developing in most people at risk. More...


Drug companies raise prices 50% to 100% and more over the last 5 years
Major drug companies took hefty price increases in the U.S., in some cases more than doubling listed charges, for widely used medications over the past five years, a Reuters analysis of proprietary data found. More...


Waistline Better Than BMI In Predicting Heart Disease Risk
A new study argues that a pear-shaped body - which carries weight around the hips - may be better than an apple-shaped body. More...


HPV Vaccine Adverse-Effects Class-Action Suit Planned in Japan
Lawyers in Japan are planning a class-action lawsuit for HPV side effects including pain disorders, movement disorders, and memory problems. More...


Beans Help With Weight Loss: Study
Beans, chickpeas, peas, lentils: Humble foods that may pack a punch for weight loss, Canadian researchers report. More...


Premature Birth Linked To Air Pollution Costs US $4.3 Billion Per Year
Thousands of yearly premature births in the United States could be linked to air pollution, a new study suggested. These implications cost the nation up to $4.3 billion per year. More...


More evidence diabetes drug Actos raises bladder cancer risk
More evidence linking the diabetes drug Actos to an increased risk of bladder cancer has surfaced in a new study that also finds the risk rises with increased use. More...


FBI investigating MedStar computer virus
The Federal Bureau of Investigation is investigating a computer virus that shut down MedStar Health Inc. More...


Mediterranean diet wins again, helps bones
The Mediterranean diet is well-known for its health benefits on your heart and waistline, but now your bones could benefit too, according to a new study published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. More...


More U.S. cities raise tobacco selling age
Places all over the country are raising the age to buy tobacco to 21. More...


Important New Evidence That It's Better for Terminally Ill People to Die at Home
Study finds that terminally ill patients live longer if they remain at home. More...


Caffeine linked to miscarriage and dad's habit matters
People who drink more than a little caffeine when they're trying for a pregnancy are more likely to lose that pregnancy early on, according to a new study. And that goes equally for men or women. More...


Heart attacks striking younger, fatter Americans
Heart attack victims in the United States are becoming younger and fatter, a new study reveals. More...


Heavy pot use tied to social, money troubles in midlife
Middle-aged adults who've smoked a lot of pot for a long time may find themselves with lower paying, less skilled and less prestigious jobs, a new study finds. More...


Exercise May Keep Your Brain 10 Years Younger, Study Suggests
Older adults who exercise regularly could buy an extra decade of good brain functioning, a new study suggests. More...


Daytime sleepiness could predict metabolic disease
If you take long naps or feel particularly sleepy during the day, you could be on the way to developing high blood pressure, high cholesterol, excess fat around the waist and high blood sugar, all of which increase the risk of heart disease. More...


Kids' fruit drinks, juices contain day's worth of sugar
Many commercially sold fruit drinks and juices give kids a full day's worth of sugar in a single serving, a new British study shows. More...


Blondes aren't dumb, Ohio State study says
The study found that the average IQ of blondes was actually slightly higher than those with other hair colors. More...


Rosacea Skin Condition Shows Link To Parkinson's Disease, Say Experts
Rosacea, a skin condition that makes a person exhibit red, swollen bumps on the face, may be linked to Parkinson's disease among the Danish, according to researchers. More...


Only 2.7 percent of U.S. adults live healthy lifestyle, Oregon State researchers find
Only 2.7 percent of adults nationwide have all four basic healthy characteristics, a new study found. More...


Good heart health is important for good cognitive function: study
Good heart health plays a crucial role in ensuring good cognitive function and better thinking skills, a new study of nearly one thousand seniors has suggested. More...


Some doctors wary as paperless prescriptions become law
he scribbled, cryptic doctor's prescription is headed toward eradication in New York, where the nation's toughest paperless-prescribing requirement takes effect this month. More...


Spice overdose epidemic in Florida leaving people in stupefied states
Investigators in Clearwater, Florida, have unveiled about an alarming rise in synthetic marijuana overdose calls. More...


Bumble Bee Tuna Recalled For Contamination Concerns
During processing, a deviation occurred which could lead to life-threatening illness if the tuna is consumed, the company said. More...


Study Fuels Hope for Memory Recovery Among Alzheimer's Patients
Alzheimer's patients may be able to recover lost memories, according to a new study. More...


Study: Cold Turkey Is Best Way To Quit Smoking
But a new study adds support to the notion that people who give up cigarettes all at once are more likely to be successful than those who wean themselves off gradually. More...


Researchers regenerate functional heart muscle with human cells
Researchers have taken another step toward creating a bioengineered human heart by using donor hearts stripped of components that would generate an immune response, and cardiac muscle cells generated from stem cells. More...


Heavy maternal smoking linked to higher risk of children developing COPD as adults
A latest study carried out by University of Melbourne medical experts has suggested that heavy maternal smoking could be linked with elevated risk of children contracting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) during adulthood. More...


Here's Why Having A Younger Sibling Is Good For Your Health
Children who have siblings a few years into their life are likely to have healthier body mass index More...


Cannabis drug succeeds in epilepsy, doubling value of GW Pharma
An experimental cannabis-based drug has successfully treated children with a rare form of severe epilepsy in a keenly anticipated clinical trial, more than doubling the value of its maker GW Pharmaceuticals. More...


Some carbs linked to increased risk of lung cancer, even non-smokers are at risk
The wrong carbs - white bread, potatoes, processed food - can lead to lung cancer. More...


Ultra-processed foods a huge chunk of American die
More than half of all calories consumed in the U.S. come from 'ultra-processed' foods, which can contribute to serious health complications like obesity and heart disease, new research finds. More...


Pistachios sold at Trader Joe's recalled over salmonella
At least 11 people have been sickened and two hospitalized resulting from a multi-state salmonella outbreak linked to pistachios. More...


ABC Stations Report on Heroin Epidemic Throughout the Country
ABC affiliates and ABC-owned stations across the country have also been reporting on the heroin epidemic. More...


Sugary, starchy diet may raise chances of lung cancer, study finds
People who eat a sugary, starchy diet may be raising their risk of lung cancer, even if they don't smoke, researchers say. More...


Physical Fitness in Youth Predicts Later Risk of Type 2 Diabetes
Young people who are physically unfit have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life, regardless of their body weight, the results of a large registry study indicate. More...


Low Prenatal Vitamin D Linked to Later MS in Offspring
Children of mothers with too little vitamin D during their pregnancy may have a higher risk of developing multiple sclerosis when they reach adulthood, a new study suggests. More...


Mother's high cholesterol linked to same problem in grown children
Adults are more likely to have high cholesterol if their mothers had it before they were born, a U.S. study suggests. More...


Happiness Can Set Off Broken Heart Syndrome
A rare condition called 'broken heart syndrome' is often linked to an emotionally difficult or stressful event, but findings of a new study suggest that the condition can also be caused by happy events and those that elicit positive emotions. More...


8 jobs that hurt your heart (and make you fat)
Scientists presenting their work at the American Heart Association conference on Tuesday found that people in some professions tend to have less healthy habits than others. More...


Low Vitamin D Level May Indicate More Aggressive Prostate Cancer
A new study suggests that having low levels of vitamin D may indicate a more aggressive form of this cancer. More...


In Obese Patients, 5 Percent Weight Loss Has Significant Health Benefits
For patients with obesity trying to lose weight, the greatest health benefits come from losing just 5 percent of their body weight, according to a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. More...


Chocolate intake linked to superior cognitive health
Chocolate intake has been linked to superior cognitive health, in a recent study featured in the journal Appetite on February 9. More...


Is glyphosate in our food? FDA wants to know
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said that it would begin testing soybeans, corn, milk, eggs and other foods for glyphosate residue. More...


Coffee Can Save You From Liver Damage
Drinking coffee may offset the risk of alcohol-related cirrhosis according to a new study. More...


About 30 Million Americans Suffer From Eating Disorders
Millions of Americans are silently suffering from eating disorders and will continue to do so in the coming years unless something is done, experts from the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) said. More...


More than a third of Americans not getting enough sleep
More than 83 million Americans are walking zombies, sleeping less than the recommended seven hours per night, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More...


Virtually all UK hospitals now in deficit
Nearly every hospital in England is now in deficit as financial problems in the NHS threaten to spiral out of control. More...


Egg Yolks Are Probably Not Linked To Heart Disease
A new Finnish study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that eating high-cholesterol foods does not increase the risk of heart disease--contrary to some previous findings. More...


ER Visits Due To Misuse Of Adderall On The Rise Among Young Adults
Misuse and emergency room visits related to Adderall use have risen dramatically, according to new research from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. More...


Tailored acupuncture might offer some fibromyalgia relief
Individualized acupuncture treatments were tied to greater pain relief for people with fibromyalgia, according to results from a small trial in Spain that compared the approach to sham acupuncture. More...


Your Neanderthal inheritance could affect your mood, your skin and your smoking habits
If you are of Asian or European descent, about 2% of your genome came from your Neanderthal ancestors, scientists say. More...


Rate of Dementia is Decreasing, Study Shows
A Boston University team contends that the rate of dementia cases is actually decreasing – potentially through healthier living. More...


Yoga Emergency Therapy As Alternative To Urgent Care, Hospital ER
A growing number of people are turning to Yoga Emergency Therapy, instead of an urgent care clinic or a hospital ER, for minor aches and pains. More...


Running gives your brain a work out, say scientists
Study finds aerobic exercise increases the neuron reserves in the area of the brain responsible for learning More...


Governments could levy sugar taxes in 2016
Several governments could levy sugar taxes in 2016, following in the footsteps of other countries which have already introduced similar measures in 2014 and 2015. More...


Concussions May Increase Suicide Risk, Study Finds
A new study has found that concussions are linked to a 300% increased risk of suicide. More...


Whooping cough vaccine is not providing long-lasting protection, study finds
The beneficial effects of the vaccine drop 75% after 3 years and 90% after 4 years. More...


High Rate of Problem Drinking Reported Among Lawyers
Lawyers struggle with substance abuse, particularly drinking, and with depression. More...


BMI Incorrectly Tags Millions Of Americans As Obese And Unhealthy
A new study found that BMI incorrectly tags million of Americans as obese and unhealthy More...


Antiperspirants Disrupt Microbiome that Resides in Armpits
A new study found that antiperspirants disrupt the natural microbiome of beneficial immune system boosting bacteria that reside in the armpits. More...


Removing Aged Cells Boosts Longevity in Mice: Study
Zapping worn-out cells in the organs of 'middle-aged' mice caused the rodents to live longer, healthier lives, said a study Wednesday that raised intriguing prospects for anti-aging treatments. More...


Scientists stunned to find Marijuana has this huge negative effect on the brain
Marijuana is often depicted as an entirely safe form of drug that is even medically beneficial - but a new study indicates that there is one big side effect on the brain. More...


Britain gives scientists permission to genetically modify human embryos
On Monday, Britain's Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority greenlighted experiments that will attempt to edit the genes of human embryos. More...


Girls Who Eat More Fiber May Face Lower Breast Cancer Risk Later: Study
Start eating vegetables, fruits, beans and whole grains early in life, experts say More...


HIV Strains Becoming Resistant To Key Antiretroviral Drug Tenofovir
Several human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients all over the world are becoming resistant to a key antiretroviral drug called tenofovir, and it's all because of inconsistent and improper drug use, a new study revealed. More...


UK 'world's worst' at breastfeeding
Rates of breastfeeding in the UK are the lowest in the world, an international study shows. More...


Caffeine Unlikely to Make Hearts Jittery
No link between chronic consumption of coffee, tea, chocolate and ectopy More...


Chinese scientists created monkeys carrying autism-related gene
Genetic engineers in Shanghai say they have created monkeys that carry a rare human gene related to autism, which could help them identify brain malfunctions that cause serious behavioral problems. More...


Encapsulated pancreatic cells offer possible new diabetes treatment
Encapsulated islet cell transplantation cured diabetes for up to six months in mice, without provoking an immune response. More...


Health insurer Centene missing data drives with client information
Health insurer Centene Corp said on Monday it is missing six hard drives containing the personal and health information of about 950,000 people. More...


WHO: Number of overweight children to double in next decade
The number of overweight and obese children under age 5 worldwide is expected to increase from at least 41 million to more than 70 million during the next decade. More...


Baby in Spain contracts rare case of scurvy after drinking only almond milk
Doctors diagnosed an 11-month-old baby in Spain with scurvy, a rare disease in developed countries, and believe his almond milk-only diet was to blame. More...


When Water is Offered at Lunch, Kids Drop Weight
NYC schools have found a small but significant decline in BMI among children who attended schools with cooled water dispensers. More...


Trader Joe's recalls massive amount of tainted raw cashews
Trader Joe's has just announced the recall of raw cashews in over 30 states after fears that they are tainted with a deadly bacteria. More...


Sleeping in on weekends may help reduce diabetes risk
Unhealthy sleep patterns combined with other factors could increase mortality risk, according to a study in Australia of people ages 45 and older. More...


Mother's high fish intake linked to baby's intelligence
Mother's high fish intake has been linked to statistically significant benefits for the baby's intelligence, in an extensive study conducted in Spain. More...


Potatoes before conceiving linked to higher risk of developing gestational diabetes while pregnant
A new study finds that women who eat more potatoes before conceiving may face a higher risk of developing gestational diabetes while pregnant. More...


EU scientists in row over safety of Glyphosate weedkiller
The World Health Organization says Glyphosate is probably carcinogenic to humans while the EU says it is probably not carcinogenic to humans. More...


Children’s cough syrup yanked from store shelves after overdose fears
Perrigo is pulling a lot of cough syrup that fall under a number of brand names bought at discount stores. More...


Exercise Still Best For Lower Back Pain
Study finds the most effective cure for back pain is still good, old-fashioned exercise and education on proper posture. More...


Heartburn Pills Linked To Increased Risk Of Kidney Disease
People who take popular heartburn pills known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may be more likely to develop chronic kidney disease than individuals who don't use these drugs, a study suggests. More...


Sugary Drink Intake Tied to Belly Fat
Habitual consumption may lead to long-term adverse changes in visceral adiposity More...


Cancer Overtakes Heart Disease as Top Killer in 22 States
Cancer death rates actually have been falling for nearly 25 years, but deaths from heart disease - the No. 1 killer nationwide - have been dropping at a steeper rate. More...


High Sugar Intake Might Lead To Cancer
Research reported recently in the medical journal Cancer Research suggests that fructose a monosaccharide found in sugar and high fructose corn syrup could be a risk factor for breast cancer development and its metastasis to the lungs. More...


FDA bans common chemical in pizza boxes
The Food and Drug Administration has banned a chemical commonly used in pizza boxes because there's a reasonable chance it could cause harm to consumers' health, including birth defects. More...


90 Percent Of Americans Consume Too Much Salt
The CDC has warned that Americans in particular are eating too much salty food, and it is damaging their heart health. More...


Chipotle Faces A Criminal Investigation Into Its Handling Of A Norovirus Outbreak
Already reeling from a series of food-borne-illness outbreaks, Chipotle Mexican Grill now faces a federal criminal investigation, as well. More...


Genetics Play Role In 23 Cancer Types, Twin Study Reveals
Risks for certain diseases and mental disorders were highly heritable for twins and non-twins in general, and that some human traits were also significantly affected by external factors More...


IVF children at no greater risk of developmental delays
Theres good news for U.S. couples struggling with infertility: children born via in vitro fertilization dont show any higher rate of developmental problems. More...


Football Player Had 'Worst' Brain Trauma Seen in Someone So Young, Doctor Says
In the researchers' report, published Monday in JAMA Neurology, doctors found clumps of abnormal tau protein scattered throughout his brain. 'It was the worst CTE I've seen in an individual this young.' More...


Sugar may increase breast, lung cancer risk, study finds
Table sugar may increase the risk of breast cancer, according to a new animal study from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. More...


First-of-a-kind drug approvals the highest in years
Approvals for first-of-a-kind drugs climbed higher last year, pushing the annual tally of new U.S. drugs to its highest level in 19 years. More...



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